hazardous substance


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hazardous substance

A substance which, by reason of being explosive, flammable, poisonous, corrosive, oxidizing, or otherwise harmful, is likely to cause death or injury.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Industrial Development Authority of Halifax County will receive $590,000 in Brownfields grant funding for hazardous substance and petroleum assessments, cleanup plans, and community outreach activities.
The environmental monitoring of hazardous substances originating in the Estonian environment was conducted as part of the Estonian National Environmental Monitoring Programme (NEMP) [3].
If it is found that hazardous substances in your building exist above the Threshold Planning Quantity (TPQ), you must not only pay a fee, but also complete and file a Risk Management Plan for that facility.
CEO Peter Webb says people who work with such material are required to become approved handlers under the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms (HSNO) Act 1996.
As the Eurasian Economic Commission (EEC), that includes Russia, Kazakhstan and Belarus, is about to adopt a Regulation restricting hazardous substances in electronic and radio-electronic equipment, manufacturers, importers and retailers active in the EEC markets should start preparing for the impending changes to the market access process.
8 million carloads of hazardous substances are shipped annually by rail in the United States, including through densely populated or environmentally sensitive areas (6-8).
CERCLA defines the term 'facility' as, in relevant part, 'any site or area where a hazardous substance has been deposited, stored, disposed of, or placed, or otherwise come to be located.
Also, the foundry can build its case for a CERCLA exemption by receiving a written statement that the sand "does not contain a harmful quantity of any hazardous substance.
As stated in the OSHA standard, personnel at the "awareness-level" are considered "likely to witness or discover a hazardous substance release and.
District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania ruled that the federal government is liable under CERCLA for the cost of an environmental cleanup necessitated by the disposal and treatment of a hazardous substance by a government contractor.
Under CERCLA, the owner or operator of a property may be held liable for the entire cost of cleaning up hazardous substances found on a site, regardless of whether the owner or operator is responsible for the release of the hazardous substance.
5) The Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006 extends this tax deduction until December 31, 2007 and expands the definition of hazardous substance to include petroleum products, a very common source of contamination on brownfields.

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