headland


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

headland

a narrow area of land jutting out into a sea, lake, etc.

headland

[′hed·lənd]
(geography)
A high, steep-faced promontory extending into the sea. Also known as head; mull.
High ground surrounding a body of water.
References in classic literature ?
The first and second headlands were directly in line with the south-west wind; but once around the second,--and we went perilously near,--we picked up the third headland, still in line with the wind and with the other two.
Diana and Jane and Ruby only waited long enough to see it caught in the current and headed for the bridge before scampering up through the woods, across the road, and down to the lower headland where, as Lancelot and Guinevere and the King, they were to be in readiness to receive the lily maid.
At this rate the flat would fill and sink long before it could drift to the lower headland.
Ruby, Jane, and Diana, already awaiting it on the lower headland, saw it disappear before their very eyes and had not a doubt but that Anne had gone down with it.
On the left the low-lying land stretched in a dim haze, rising here and there into a darker blur which marked the higher capes and headlands.
Some of the inhabitants remarked to me that they never viewed one of those bay-like recesses, with the headlands receding on both hands, without being struck with their resemblance to a bold sea-coast.
As they approached the entrance of the port, the giant straddled clear across it, with a foot firmly planted on each headland, and uplifting his club to such a height that its butt-end was hidden in the cloud, he stood in that formidable posture, with the sun gleaming all over his metallic surface.
Nevertheless, straddling from headland to headland, as his custom was, Talus attempted to strike a blow at the vessel, and, overreaching himself, tumbled at full length into the sea, which splashed high over his gigantic shape, as when an iceberg turns a somerset.
A low point concealed them from the headland, and the margin of the lake was fringed for some distance with dense and overhanging bushes.
Now the view broadens; through the gateway of the sentinel headlands you gaze out over the wide Rhine plain, which stretches away, softly and richly tinted, grows gradually and dreamily indistinct, and finally melts imperceptibly into the remote horizon.
In our most trivial walks, we are constantly, though unconsciously, steering like pilots by certain well-known beacons and headlands, and if we go beyond our usual course we still carry in our minds the bearing of some neighboring cape; and not till we are completely lost, or turned round -- for a man needs only to be turned round once with his eyes shut in this world to be lost -- do we appreciate the vastness and strangeness of nature.
Between bold headlands of rock and under a gray cloud-blown sky, a dozen boats, long and lean and dark, beaked like monstrous birds, were landing on a foam-whitened beach of sand.