Hearth

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hearth

the bottom part of a metallurgical furnace in which the molten metal is produced or contained

Hearth

That part of the floor directly in front of the fireplace, and the floor inside the fireplace on which the fire is built, made of fire-resistant masonry.

Hearth

 

a furnace for smelting, resmelting, and heating metals and firing ceramic products; the lower part of a shaft furnace in which fuel is combusted.

Hearths have been known since approximately the third millennium B.C. The so-called direct-process hearths found on the territory of the USSR date from the first millennium B.C. Forge hearths served to heat metals before forging and hardening. Pottery hearths or kilns were used to fire pottery. Bloomeries for the conversion of pig iron into iron have been known since the 15th century.

In modern terms, the hearth is an industrial furnace wider than it is high (when the height is greater than the width, the furnace is called a shaft furnace). The hearth consists of a steel chamber lined inside with brick and open at the top. The side walls of the hearth have openings or tuyeres to deliver air. Gaseous products of combustion are disposed of through the open top of the hearth or through an exhaust pipe. A hearth can operate on charcoal, coke, oil, or gas. Ordinarily, the efficiency of hearths does not exceed 5 percent, with the result that they have not found widespread industrial use. Crucible hearths are used in metallurgy for crucible melting of metals, and specially designed hearths are used to obtain lead from ore concentrates.


Hearth

 

(1) An open flat space for kindling and maintaining a fire, usually inside a dwelling. According to archaeological evidence, hearths have been known since the Lower Paleolithic. In the Upper Paleolithic, hearths were often constructed of stones and sometimes coated with clay.

In round dwellings the hearth is usually located in the center of the dwelling, as in the chums of the Nentsy, Evenki, and other peoples of the North; in rectangular dwellings it is near a wall, usually opposite the entrance, as in the houses of some peoples of Dagestan. A transitional type of construction is the hearth placed directly against the wall with a clay-coated wicker pipe for the smoke (among some peoples of the Balkan Peninsula, Siberia, the Caucasus, and Middle Asia). In time the hearth against the wall developed into the fireplace.

The hearth played an important role in various rituals. Among many peoples—including the ancient Greeks, Romans, Slavs, Teutons, and, until recent times, the peoples of the Caucasus and Siberia—it was considered a sacred place in the dwelling.

(2) In a figurative sense, hearth means home, shelter, or the family (the home hearth).

(3) A source from which something, such as a cultural influence, emanates.


Hearth

 

(or bottom), the part of a furnace on which the materials or items undergoing heat treatment (heating, melting, or annealing) are placed.

Hearths of melting furnaces are usually made of refractory materials. Electric-arc furnaces may be constructed with current-conducting hearths, in which case the hearth is one of the electrodes. Hearths of heating furnaces usually also have a refractory lining. A distinction is made between stationary, bogie, moveable, revolving, and roller-hearth furnaces. In multideck, or multihearth, drying and annealing furnaces, the hearths are placed at various levels along the vertical axis of the furnace, and the material being processed pours down from one hearth to another.

What does it mean when you dream about a hearth?

The hearth signifies a place to return to home values and nurturing feelings. It is traditionally the center of sacred beginnings and also of sacred rituals. It also represents a chance to begin again.

hearth

[härth]
(building construction)
The floor of a fireplace or brick oven.
The projection in front of a fireplace, made of brick, stone, or cement.
(metallurgy)
The floor of a reverberatory, open-hearth, cupola, or blast furnace; it is made of refractory material able to support the charge and to collect the molten products.

hearth

1. The floor of a fireplace (usually brick, tile, or stone) together with an adjacent area of fireproof material.
2. An area permanently floored with fireproof material beneath and surrounding a stove.

hearth

symbol of home life. [Folklore: Jobes, 738]
References in classic literature ?
Rochester, having quitted the Eshtons, stands on the hearth as solitary as she stands by the table: she confronts him, taking her station on the opposite side of the mantelpiece.
Having no desire to be entertained by a cat-and-dog combat, I stepped forward briskly, as if eager to partake the warmth of the hearth, and innocent of any knowledge of the interrupted dispute.
When Alcinous heard this he took Ulysses by the hand, raised him from the hearth, and bade him take the seat of Laodamas, who had been sitting beside him, and was his favourite son.
The light from the hearth quivered upon the flowers and foliage that were wrought into its oaken back; and the lion's head at the summit seemed almost to move its jaws and shake its mane.
For I know what to think when a young girl shivers by a warm hearth, and complains of lonesomeness at her mother's side.
On the other side of the hearth, from the sofa-corner where he supposed that she still crouched, he heard a faint stifled crying like a child's.
Eliza tries to control herself and feel indifferent as she rises and walks across to the hearth to switch off the lights.
No one noticed so small a creature as a Woggle-Bug, and when I found that the hearth was even warmer and more comfortable than the sunshine, I resolved to establish my future home beside it.
It wouldn't allow itself to be adjusted on the top bar; it wouldn't hear of accommodating itself kindly to the knobs of coal; it WOULD lean forward with a drunken air, and dribble, a very Idiot of a kettle, on the hearth.
As soon as he got indoors he put the Serpent down on the hearth before the fire.
On the evening of the 9th of November in 1878, at about nine o'clock, young Charles Ashmore left the family circle about the hearth, took a tin bucket and started toward the spring.
Hesiod's diction is in the main Homeric, but one of his charms is the use of quaint allusive phrases derived, perhaps, from a pre- Hesiodic peasant poetry: thus the season when Boreas blows is the time when `the Boneless One gnaws his foot by his fireless hearth in his cheerless house'; to cut one's nails is `to sever the withered from the quick upon that which has five branches'; similarly the burglar is the `day-sleeper', and the serpent is the `hairless one'.