heat of hydration

heat of hydration

[′hēt əv hī′drā·shən]
(physical chemistry)
The increase in enthalpy accompanying the formation of 1 mole of a hydrate from the anhydrous form of the compound and from water at constant pressure.

heat of hydration

Heat evolved by chemical reactions with water, as during the setting and hardening of portland cement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tricalcium silicates are the most reactive, generating high heat of hydration or exotherm.
Both the aluminate and the ferrite phase contribute to the heat of hydration and affect the rheology of the setting concrete.
Abstract: Heat of hydration up to 72 hours and compressive strength up to 7 days of Portland cement and 17 binary and ternary cements containing fly ash, silica fume, and metakaolin, at a water/cement ratio of 0.
Primary considerations in selecting the optimum concrete mix formulation for the bridge towers, piles, columns, caps and piers were strength, long-term durability, low heat of hydration, and excellent ASR mitigation and sulfate resistance.
The experimental test results are also shows that the heat was reduced in cement pastes by controlling the heat of hydration.
This heat of hydration is a much greater problem for Freedom Tower's thick core walls, categorized as Mass Concrete, than for the conventional concrete walls outside the core," said Eilon.
Each mix design of thermal grout is different and is based on several requirements: thermal conductivity, flow (time of efflux), strength, rate of hardening and heat of hydration.
Removing the heat of hydration from concrete before supplying it for construction is one of the most important aspects of concrete cooling.
In addition, the amount of limestone increase the heat of hydration and the free lime contents enhance slightly.
Replacing up to 50% of traditional Portland cement improves concrete strength by increasing the product's chemical resistance and durability, slower hydration rates and lower heat of hydration improves the integrity of mass concrete structures like large foundations, bridges and other structures.
However, the majority of the compatibility tests consist in comparing the kinetics of hydration of the wood-cement mixture to that of pure cement, by measuring the temperature or the heat of hydration (Sandermann et al.
Increase cement content: Heat of hydration in concrete is due to the exothermic (heat-producing) nature of the hydration reaction.