heel spur


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Related to heel spur: heel pain, plantar fasciitis

heel spur

[′hēl ‚spər]
(medicine)
A bony growth produced by excessive musculoskeletal tension at the heel. Also known as calcaneal exostosis.
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Red star in Figure 1) This disorder is commonly associated with plantar heel spurs, but there is debate about the presence of heel spurs as a cause of pain; studies have discovered 50%-75% of heel pain patients have heel spurs.
12) Radiographic identification of a plantar heel spur usually indicates that the condition has been present for at least 6 to 12 months, whether having been symptomatic or asymptomatic.
10 The study showed comparable shor t-time results for patients with plantar fasciitis and a heel spur.
Histopathologically, the heel spur is a fibroostosis promoted by mechanical stress to the plantar aponeurosis, slowly and continuously growing into its insertion region (13).
Pain caused by a heel spur often may be relieved by rest, ice, exercises, and/or shoe inserts.
Similar reductions in self-reported pain were seen in the smaller groups of patients treated for heel spur or humeral epicondylitis.
Most doctors now think that heel spurs (little lumps of bone that grow forward from the leading edge of the heel bone) are the result of heel problems and not the cause.
Other sources of pain may be minute breaks in your heel bone or a heel spur, which is a bony growth on the underside of the heel bone.
Sports medicine devices will help monitor, diagnose and treat athlete burnout and injuries such as plantar fasciitis, heel spur, flat feet, Morton's neuroma, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament injuries (PCL), hammer toe, arthritis, chronic back pain, calf stiffness, tennis elbow, rotator cuff injuries, Achilles tendon injury, etc.
12 Health: Doctor Gareth offers advice on a painful heel spur, dislocated ribs and a 20-year-old football knee injury.
Similar reductions in self-reported pain were documented in the smaller populations of patients treated for heel spur or humeral epicondylitis.
QI HAVE a heel spur and find it painful to walk, even with heel cushions.