heel

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heel

1
1. the back part of the human foot from the instep to the lower part of the ankle
2. the corresponding part in other vertebrates
3. Horticulture the small part of the parent plant that remains attached to a young shoot cut for propagation and that ensures more successful rooting
4. Nautical
a. the bottom of a mast
b. the after end of a ship's keel
5. the back part of a golf club head where it bends to join the shaft
6. Rugby possession of the ball as obtained from a scrum (esp in the phrase get the heel)

heel

2
inclined position from the vertical

Heel

The lower end of an upright member, especially one resting on a support.

What does it mean when you dream about a heel?

The heel is often used synonymously for the foot as a symbol, for example, to represent violence or oppression (e.g., under the heel of a dictator). As the part of the body most often in contact with the ground and dirt, it can be a symbol of the base or ignoble, for instance, a low, vile, contemptible, despicable person (a “heel”). The heel is also often represented by the analogous part of a shoe, which is frequently in shabby condition (“down at the heels”), perhaps signifying something in the dreamer’s life that needs attention. Finally, the heel can also represent vulnerability, as in an Achilles’ heel.

heel

[hēl]
(mechanical engineering)
(metallurgy)
A quantity of molten metal remaining in the ladle after pouring a metal cast-ing.
A quantity of metal retained in an induction furnace during a stand-by period.
(navigation)
Of a ship, to incline or to be inclined to one side.
(ordnance)
Upper corner of the butt of a rifle stock held in firing position.

heel

1. The lower end of an upright timber, esp. one resting on a support.
2. The lower end of the hanging stile of a door.
3. The floor brace for timbers that brace a wall.
4. The trailing edge of the blade of a bulldozer, or the like.
References in classic literature ?
the weight is too much on the heel, and the toes are squared, as though one of the French dancers had been in, pigeon-winging his tribe
The schoolmaster now bestowed both whip and heel upon the starveling ribs of old Gunpowder, who dashed forward, snuffling and snorting, but came to a stand just by the bridge, with a suddenness that had nearly sent his rider sprawling over his head.
The young imps on the verandah were not disappointed in their hope of hearing him "swar," which he did with a fluency and fervency which delighted them all amazingly, as they ducked and dodged hither and thither, to be out of the reach of his riding-whip; and, all whooping off together, they tumbled, in a pile of immeasurable giggle, on the withered turf under the verandah, where they kicked up their heels and shouted to their full satisfaction.
Two shouts rang out, one close upon the heels of the other:
and when those thrilling notes come floating down the distance I hear them without fail, even if I am two miles away; and then - oh, then you should see my heels get down to business!
One lecture follows right on the heels of another, with very little time for the student to get out of one hall and into the next; but the industrious ones manage it by going on a trot.
The minute he was on, the horse begun to rip and tear and jump and cavort around, with two circus men hanging on to his bridle trying to hold him, and the drunk man hanging on to his neck, and his heels flying in the air every jump, and the whole crowd of people standing up shouting and laughing till tears rolled down.
As to the first, you are to understand, that for about seventy moons past there have been two struggling parties in this empire, under the names of TRAMECKSAN and SLAMECKSAN, from the high and low heels of their shoes, by which they distinguish themselves.
This company was now at his heels, and after the first shock of mutual surprise, the Bishop gave an exultant shout and spurred upon the outlaw.
The thunderclaps, treading one on the heels of another and with a strange crackling accompaniment, sounded more like the working of a gigantic electric machine than the usual detonating reverberations.
it does no harm, and it only keeps a man by the heels for the small matter of two glasses”
All you have to do is to knock the heels together three times and command the shoes to carry you wherever you wish to go.