helium I


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helium I

[′hē·lē·əm ′wən]
(cryogenics)
The phase of liquid helium-4 which is stable at temperatures above the lambda point (about 2.2 K) and has the properties of a normal liquid, except low density.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because it's so cold, liquid helium is used to chill special magnets inside medical scanners.
Because it is an inert gas, helium is used in applications as varied as arc welding, semiconductor production and thermo-acoustic refrigeration.
Government, helium is critical in space, defense, and advanced energy systems--there is no substitute if temperatures below minus 429 degrees Fahrenheit are needed.
Helium is a blimp which long ago lost its value as a means of cargo transportation, military reconnaissance, or anti-aircraft defence.
However, current demand has exceeded the government's expectations, according to the NAS, and a significant amount of the helium is being sold outside the United States.
Helium is produced as a by-product of natural gas refinement.
In the midst of increasing volatility in the traditional media industry, Helium is attracting thousands of publishers and connecting them with high quality subject matter experts on a regular basis.
Worldwide demand for helium is ballooning," says Bureau of Land Management spokesman Hans Smart.
Superfluid helium does not support the formation of bubbles within the target chambers, and more importantly, the small-angle neutron scattering cross-section of superfluid helium is smaller than normal liquid helium by a factor of 5 [11,12].
Its helium is sold to Europe, which until 1994 relied almost entirely on the US.
Helium is an essential feedstock for numerous industrial, medical, scientific and commercial applications including nuclear power generation, magnetic resonance imaging ('MRI'), industrial fabrication and welding, fundamental sciences and research, fiber optics, space and defence applications, semiconductor manufacturing, and many other applications.