hematogenous


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to hematogenous: Hematogenous Osteomyelitis

hematogenous

[¦hēm·ə¦täj·ə·nəs]
(physiology)
Pertaining to the production of blood or of its fractions.
Carried by way of the bloodstream.
Originating in blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
This clinical report describes a hematogenous osteomyelitis and polyarthritis in a juvenile peregrine falcon associated with S hyicus septicemia.
5,6) In their review of metastases of the digestive tract up to 1983, Caramella et al (7) found only 265 cases of metastases to the colon and rectum; this number included all secondary tumors by either direct invasion, dissemination by (or from) peritoneal seeding, or hematogenous spread.
3) Subsequent hematogenous dissemination may cause extrapulmonary disease.
Proposed mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of cryptococcal peritonitis include direct percutaneous inoculation of contaminating organisms during repeated paracentesis for management of ascites, hematogenous spread from a pulmonary site, and hematogenous spread from the alimentary tract facilitated by upper GI bleeding.
The CMCs are possibly intermittently shed into blood, or hematogenous dissemination occurs in a small proportion of melanoma patients.
The AGB+ catheter, in combination with the Maximal Barrier kit's contents, is an integrated system for combating five sources of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI): environmental contamination, skin flora, post-placement subcutaneous tract infection, intraluminal contamination, and hematogenous seeding.
The mode of spread is hematogenous or by direct extension of a neighboring focus in the lungs or lymph nodes.
In most such cases, intracranial extension of tuberculosis occurs as the result of hematogenous or lymphogenous spread.
We hypothesize that the infection in this patient might have developed from hematogenous seeding in which an undiscovered and asymptomatic oral infectious nidus might have served as the seeding focus while mild trauma to the hip could have facilitated access to the joint space.
In dogs and humans, hematogenous spread of bacteria or fungi is the most common origin of discospondylitis.