hepatic

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Related to hepatic fibrosis: Liver fibrosis, Hepatic cirrhosis, Congenital hepatic fibrosis

hepatic

1. of or relating to the liver
2. Botany of or relating to the liverworts
3. having the colour of liver
4. Obsolete any of various drugs for use in treating diseases of the liver
References in periodicals archive ?
Currently, the diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis is most commonly conducted by a liver biopsy, in which a needle is inserted through the skin into the liver, a sample of which is then removed for measurement.
Liver involvement is a result of congenital hepatic fibrosis or Caroli disease, which may progress to portal hypertension, hypersplenism with resultant thrombocytopenia and recurrent ascending cholangitis (Caroli syndrome).
Increased caffeine consumption is associated with reduced hepatic fibrosis.
Multiple analyses showed a negative correlation between coffee consumption and risk of hepatic fibrosis.
CONCLUSIONS: Silymarin retards the development of alcohol-induced hepatic fibrosis in baboons, consistent with several positive clinical trials.
NADPH oxidase signal transduces angiotensin II in hepatic stellate cells and is critical in hepatic fibrosis.
The stage of hepatic fibrosis was also significantly weakened.
One proposed therapeutic target against hepatic fibrosis is suppression of the HSCs, possibly via inhibition of transforming growth factor [beta] (TGF-[beta]) or blockage of its downstream signalling pathway.
Hepatic fibrosis is a healing process gone awry in response to ongoing liver injury in ALD (Siegmund et al.
japonicum causes intestinal schistosomiasis and periportal hepatic fibrosis.
An important component of the management of hepatic fibrosis is the clinical assessment of disease severity.
The importance of this topic was also highlighted by the findings of a recent study presented at this year's Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Montreal showing a high prevalence of hepatic fibrosis and steatosis in HIV/AIDS patients without chronic viral hepatitis but with chronically elevated transaminases on antiretroviral therapy [5].