hepatotoxin

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hepatotoxin

[¦hep·əd·ō′täk·sən]
(pharmacology)
An agent capable of damaging the liver.
References in periodicals archive ?
This finding is of particular relevance, since orally ingested N-oxides of PAs have similar hepatotoxic properties as their parent alkaloids, following their reduction to the corresponding free base in the human intestine (Wiedenfeld 2011; Mattocks 1986).
However, in the SA setting, HIV/TB co-infected patients with DILI often have significant immune suppression and large mycobacterial loads, and the clinician may initiate a TB treatment backbone that excludes the first-line hepatotoxic drugs while the LFTs settle and until the patient is ready for rechallenge.
Flavokawain B, the hepatotoxic constituent from kava root, induces GSH-sensitive oxidative stress through modulation of IKK/NF-kappaB and MAPK signaling pathways.
The results of the present study suggest that the hepatotoxic effects of these drugs can be largely prevented by coadministration of NAC.
Study design: The site of TB, method of establishing the diagnosis of TB, history of chronic liver disease, history of concomitant intake of other hepatotoxic drugs and alcohol intake were recorded.
Among the topics are the design of toxicity studies of inhaled nanomedicines, biological properties of red elemental selenium at nano size in vitro and in vivo, the hepatotoxic potential of nanomaterials, in vivo hypersensitive pulmonary disease models for nanotoxicity, the incidence and mechanisms of iron oxide nanoparticle toxicity, and the safety assessment of engineered nanomaterials in direct food additives and food contact materials.
Taken at recommended doses, naltrexone does not appear to be hepatotoxic, but it is contraindicated in patients with cirrhosis, as well as those receiving or dependent on opioids.
450] isenozymes which leads to elevation of the plasma concentrations of other hepatotoxic medications (10).
The mechanisms of cyanobacterial toxicity are diverse, ranging from hepatotoxic and neurotoxic effects to the inhibition of protein synthesis.
Clinical studies with up to four years follow-up have not disclosed any hepatotoxic effects of the drug in patients treated with this phosphate binder.
Most common side effect is GI upset Zingiber officinale (ginger root) Used for its purported stimulant and antiemetic properties Rubus idaeus (red raspberry leaf) Phytoestrogens bind to estrogen receptors Valeriana officinalis (Valeriana root) Noted to be hepatotoxic, it has been used for its purported sleep aid benefit