heritage


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heritage

1. 
a. the evidence of the past, such as historical sites, buildings, and the unspoilt natural environment, considered collectively as the inheritance of present-day society
b. (as modifier; cap. as part of name): Bannockburn Heritage Centre
2. Law any property, esp land, that by law has descended or may descend to an heir
3. Bible
a. the Israelites regarded as belonging inalienably to God
b. the land of Canaan regarded as God's gift to the Israelites
References in classic literature ?
There had been changes, differentiations brought about by diverse conditions and infusions of other blood; but down at the bottom of their beings, twisted into the fibres of them, was a heritage in common, a sameness in kind that time had not obliterated.
It was a heritage he had received directly from One Eye and the she-wolf; but to them, in turn, it had been passed down through all the generations of wolves that had gone before.
Now that he had lost his heritage, Tom seemed to see for the first time how goodly it had been, how rich in power, pleasure, and gracious opportunities.
humorist of antiquity, leaving to mankind a heritage of woe
The old belief in the malevolence of the dead body was lost from the creeds and even perished from tradition, but it left its heritage of terror, which is transmitted from generation to generation--is as much a part of us as are our blood and bones.
Also, I still believed in the old myths which were the heritage of the American boy when I was a boy.
The heritage of law was hers, and right conduct, to her, was the fulfilment of the law.
There were stories enough of their bold and daring deeds to fill many books, so that we feel that Walter had been born into a heritage of Romance.
All in all, it was a never-to-be-forgotten summer--one of those summers which come seldom into any life, but leave a rich heritage of beautiful memories in their going--one of those summers which, in a fortunate combination of delightful weather, delightful friends and delightful doings, come as near to perfection as anything can come in this world.
He knew neither fear nor mercy, except upon rare occasions when some strange, inexplicable force stayed his hand--a force inexplicable to him, perhaps, because of his ignorance of his own origin and of all the forces of humanitarianism and civilization that were his rightful heritage because of that origin.
But of a heritage that may expand gradually, he had no conception: he hoped to come to Culture suddenly, much as the Revivalist hopes to come to Jesus.
It is their inborn heritage to strive to devour, and to strive not to be devoured.