Hermitage

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Hermitage,

in France: see MontmorencyMontmorency,
town (1990 pop. 21,003), Val d'Oise dept., N France, a suburb N of Paris. J. J. Rousseau lived there (1756–62), first at the nearby "Hermitage," a cottage on the estate of his friend, Mme d'Épinay, and after his quarrel with her, in Montmorency itself.
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, France.

Hermitage

(ĕr'mētäzh`), museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, one of the world's foremost houses of art, consisting of six buildings along the embankment of the Neva River. Its central building, the Winter Palace (erected 1754–62 by Czarina Elizabeth and the traditional winter residence of the czars), was damaged in an 1837 fire and reconstructed in the neoclassical style in the 19th cent. from the original pavilion palace. Its magnificant collection began as the private collection of Catherine II (Catherine the Great), which she purchased in 1764. Opened to the public in 1852, the museum contained only the imperial collections until 1917. There are now more than three million items in the Hermitage collection, including some 8,000 paintings of the Flemish, French, Dutch, Spanish, and Italian schools as well as superb modern works, with many by Rembrandt, Rubens, Picasso, and Matisse. The art collections also include the art of India, China, Egypt, pre-Columbian America, Greece, and Rome, as well as Scythian art from the Eurasian steppe. There are tapestries, ivories, and furniture. "The Heroic Past of the Russian People" includes the War Museum and a tribute to Peter the Great. Another part is devoted to the life and works of Pushkin. Russian art is exhibited separately in Mikhailovsky Palace, which was opened in 1898. In 2004 the Hermitage, which had previously inaugurated small foreign outlets in London and Las Vegas (in collaboration with the Guggenheim MuseumGuggenheim Museum,
officially Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, major museum of modern art in New York City. Founded in 1939 as the Museum of Non-objective Art, the Guggenheim is known for its remarkable circular building (1959) with curving interior ramp designed by Frank Lloyd
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), opened a large branch in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, which exhibits loans from the parent institution.

Bibliography

See V. Suslov, ed., Great Art Treasures of the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg (2 vol., 1995) and the catalog Hidden Treasures Revealed: Impressionist Masterpieces and Other Important French Paintings Preserved by the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg (1995).


Hermitage:

see Jackson, AndrewJackson, Andrew,
1767–1845, 7th President of the United States (1829–37), b. Waxhaw settlement on the border of South Carolina and North Carolina (both states claim him). Early Career

A child of the backwoods, he was left an orphan at 14.
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.

Hermitage

 

a name often given to such isolated structures as suburban villas and park pavilions. An example is the Hermitage in Catherine Park in the city of Pushkin (1743–54, architects M. G. Zemtsov, V. V. Rastrelli, and others). In the mid-18th century in St. Petersburg, the name was applied to the halls of the Winter Palace that housed art collections and that were open only to the elite. It later passed to the museum buildings that were erected next to the palace. In Leningrad, the museum incorporating the palace and buildings is now known as the Hermitage(seeHERMITAGE, STATE).

hermitage

1. A private retreat.
2. A secluded hideaway.
3. A house of certain monastic orders.

hermitage

the abode of a hermit
References in classic literature ?
He hurried to the Hermitage, which stood in the heart of the wood, unlocked the door with a hasty wrench, slammed it after him, pitched Zeluco into the most distant corner, and thrusting his right hand into his pocket, first walked four or five times up and down the scanty length of the little room, and then seated himself on the ottoman in an uncomfortable stiff way, as we often do when we wish not to abandon ourselves to feeling.
He got up and threw open the windows, to let in the soft breath of the afternoon, and the healthy scent of the firs that made a belt round the Hermitage.
It was a long while--more than an hour before Arthur had brought his meditations to this point; but once arrived there, he could stay no longer at the Hermitage.
Since he was certain there were no private arms in the whole principality, he was a hundred times more certain there were none in the Quaker's little hermitage on the hill, where he lived on herbs, with two old rustic servants, and with no other voice of man for year after year.
At the Hermitage we were about fifteen or eighteen hundred feet above the sea, and thus far a portion of the ascent had been pretty abrupt.
Sergius obeyed the starets, showed his letter to the Abbot, and having obtained his permission, gave up his cell, handed all his possessions over to the monastery, and set out for the Tambov hermitage.
At Carnival time, in the sixth year of Sergius's life at the hermitage, a merry company of rich people, men and women from a neighbouring town, made up a troyka-party, after a meal of carnival-pancakes and wine.
Enjoy a comfortable residence room or stay in a hermitage for more privacy.
Summary: Readers will soon be able to take an interactive tour of the Qannoubine Valley in north Lebanon, thanks to author George Arab's soon-to-be released book which offers a detailed description of the history, caves and hermitages that can be found on location.
The hermitages, located deep in the woods, were built by Mulgrew.
Francis of Assisi on a number of occasions went to local hermitages in Italy to strengthen his spiritual life in an atmosphere of solitude, and even wrote a short set of spiritual rules for his fellow Franciscans to follow when they went into a period of hermitage.
Three hermitages and awesome Dwelling Place chapel for those seeking intimacy with God; private and directed retreats, desert spirituality live-ins or sabbaticals.