heroic


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heroic

, heroical
1. of, relating to, or resembling the heroes of classical mythology
2. Prosody of, relating to, or resembling heroic verse
3. (of the arts, esp sculpture) larger than life-size; smaller than colossal
4. RC Church
a. held to such a degree as to enable a person to perform virtuous actions with exceptional promptness, ease and pleasure, and with self-abnegation and self-control
b. performed or undergone by such a person
References in classic literature ?
There she fell miserably short of the true heroic height.
The Irish ranchers twitted me good-naturedly on my exploit, and patted me on the back until I felt that I had done something heroic.
Dryden did not invent the heroic couplet, but it was he who first made it famous.
It is not written in Dryden's favorite heroic couplet but in blank verse.
But early in his dramatic career he, almost contemporaneously with other dramatists, introduced the rimed couplet, especially in his heroic plays.
The heroic books, even if printed in the character of our mother tongue, will always be in a language dead to degenerate times; and we must laboriously seek the meaning of each word and line, conjecturing a larger sense than common use permits out of what wisdom and valor and generosity we have.
Homer has never yet been printed in English, nor AEschylus, nor Virgil even -- works as refined, as solidly done, and as beautiful almost as the morning itself; for later writers, say what we will of their genius, have rarely, if ever, equalled the elaborate beauty and finish and the lifelong and heroic literary labors of the ancients.
In harmony with this delight in personal advantages there is in their plays a certain heroic cast of character and dialogue, --as in Bonduca, Sophocles, the Mad Lover, the Double Marriage,--wherein the speaker is so earnest and cordial and on such deep grounds of character, that the dialogue, on the slightest additional incident in the plot, rises naturally into poetry.
Surely it will be allowed that none could be more proper than the present, where we are about to introduce a considerable character on the scene; no less, indeed, than the heroine of this heroic, historical, prosaic poem.
He was obviously convinced, especially now after drinking, that he was performing a heroic action, and he bragged of it in the most unpleasant way.
Her object attained in astute secrecy, the heroic old woman had made a clean breast of it to Mrs Verloc.
For a moment he was tempted by despair to give up; but recalling the quiet, sad face of the heroic girl, he felt profoundly ashamed of his weakness.