hesitation

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hesitation

[‚hez·ə′tā·shən]
(computer science)
A brief automatic suspension of the operations of a main program in order to perform all or part of another operation, such as rapid transmission of data to or from a peripheral unit.
References in classic literature ?
Ginevra guessed her mother's intention by the timid hesitation on her face, and she smiled sadly.
He coloured, seemed perplexed, looked doubtingly, and, after some hesitation, said,--
Whatever I can say which will open your eyes to the real danger, and strengthen your conviction of the instant necessity of averting it, I say in despite of myself, without hesitation and without reserve.
Geniuses are rare and, without being at all an undue praiser of times past, one can say without hesitation that until the appearance of Hugh Lofting, the successor of Miss Yonge, Mrs.
I could not recover myself in some time, till the governor assured me, "that I should receive no hurt:" and observing my two companions to be under no concern, who had been often entertained in the same manner, I began to take courage, and related to his highness a short history of my several adventures; yet not without some hesitation, and frequently looking behind me to the place where I had seen those domestic spectres.
I forgot all--fatigue, friends and collections--and accepted without hesitation the offer of the American Government.
He had sacrificed his fortune, and was now risking his life, all without hesitation, from duty, in silence.
But," said he with a momentary hesitation, "you know I'm dying to hear of how you came to be alone in that boat.
And I know that every one will confess that it would be most praiseworthy in a prince to exhibit all the above qualities that are considered good; but because they can neither be entirely possessed nor observed, for human conditions do not permit it, it is necessary for him to be sufficiently prudent that he may know how to avoid the reproach of those vices which would lose him his state; and also to keep himself, if it be possible, from those which would not lose him it; but this not being possible, he may with less hesitation abandon himself to them.
Tales of hesitation and uncertainty on the part of those high in place and responsibility came to their ears.
Still, to betray hesitation or fear would be to discover his actual weakness, and to invite attack.
The movable bridges, the agitated sailors, the noise of the water on the pebbles, the cries and importunities of those who wait upon the shores, are multiplied details of that sensation which is summed up in one single result -- hesitation.