extender

(redirected from hetastarch)
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extender

[ik′sten·dər]
(chemistry)
A material used to dilute or extend or change the properties of resins, ceramics, paints, rubber, and so on.
(electricity)
A male or female receptacle connected by a short cable to make a test point more conveniently accessible to a test probe.

extender

1. A white, inert mineral pigment of low opacity; used in paints to provide bulk, texture, or a lower gloss or to reduce paint cost. Common extenders are calcium carbonate, silica, diatomaceous earth, talc, and clay.
2. A substance added to synthetic resin adhesives to increase volume and reduce cost without affecting quality.
References in periodicals archive ?
That haemodilution with saline, 4% albumin and 6% hetastarch does not increase the SIG.
In the United States, 6% hetastarch in lactated electrolyte injection is sold under the brand name Hextend(R) for the treatment of blood loss during surgery.
The report, entitled "Strategies To Reduce Military and Civilian Blood Transfusions" (in reference to an effort under the acronym "STORMACT"), proposed an algorithm in which 6% hetastarch in lactated electrolyte injection was used for treating wounded military personnel.
has received approval of an Abbreviated New Drug Application from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for 6% Hetastarch in 0.
It is the only plasma volume expander containing hetastarch, multiple electrolytes, lactate and physiological amounts of glucose.
PentaLyte contains pentastarch, a medium molecular weight hydroxyethyl starch that is metabolized and cleared from the blood stream faster than the hydroxyethyl starch used in Hextend and other 6% hetastarch solutions.
The control group received 6% hetastarch in saline, with saline as a concomitant crystalloid, to treat blood loss during major elective surgery.
It is the only commercially available plasma expander that contains multiple electrolytes, glucose, a physiological buffer and hetastarch.
Hextend(R) was approved for the treatment of large volume blood loss during surgery, and is the only plasma expander that contains multiple electrolytes, glucose, a physiological buffer and hetastarch.
Hextend(R), approved for large-volume use in major surgery, is the only blood plasma volume expander that contains hetastarch, buffer, multiple electrolytes, and glucose.
The double blind randomized study comparing Ilextend(R) (a buffered physiologically balanced solution containing hetastarch, electrolytes and other components) and hetastarch in saline was conducted at Mt.
The thrust of Abelson's article is that there may be a limited market for BioTime's new blood plasma expander product, Hextend, because BioTime's product contains hetastarch, and some physicians do not like to use the older hetastarch solutions that are presently on the market.