heterodox

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heterodox

at variance with established, orthodox, or accepted doctrines or beliefs
References in periodicals archive ?
The opening contribution by Tim Thornton considers the case for heterodoxy and challenges the view that mainstream economics is already heterodox.
However, despite their connections to heterodoxy, not all these rebellions are now viewed negatively.
But the heterodoxy of openness theology becomes evident on reflection.
Kerby-Fulton here offers research that will no doubt spark an overdue spate of revisionist analyses of the theologico-political climate in late medieval England, studies that will further respond to a culture that eschews simplistic bifurcated accounts of orthodoxy and heterodoxy.
Consequently, he moved to Libya to lecture at the University of Benghazi from 1967 to 1973, but was unexpectedly imprisoned following accusations of atheism and heterodoxy.
Tradition, Heterodoxy and Religious Culture: Judaism and Christianity in the Early Modern Period.
So also are the public disputes that Locke felt compelled to enter during the last decade of his life: with John Edwards on the alleged Socinianism of The Reasonableness of Christianity (which Woolhouse rightly disputes); with Edward Stillingfleet, Bishop of Worcester, and Thomas Burnet, who argued that the views expressed in the Essay promoted heterodoxy, especially with respect to the trinity and the immortality of the soul; with Jonas Proast on toleration.
Jenkins leans more toward heterodoxy, defined as "opinions or doctrines at variance with an official or orthodox position.
Contributors argue in print about whether the "science wars" are really over, addressing the present aftermath of the discourses of the sciences, the influence of cultures, the structures of knowledge and the idea of becoming civilized; those on science in action describe human well-being, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, and reproductive biology; and global cognitive justice, addressing new knowledge producers, unruly ecological complexity, the demise of critical theory (in economics), international consultancy, coloniality and the geopolitics of the production of knowledge, systematic knowledge in a tropic setting and moving from an epistemology of blindness to an epistemology of seeing.
He places Chinese Christianity in the context of Chinese popular religion and the Qing state's attempt to suppress what it regarded as heterodoxy.
The makeup of this volume is more evidence of Swain's heterodoxy.
Specific topics discussed include Christian identity, Christian martyrdom, heterodoxy and orthodoxy, conjugal ethics and apostolic homewreckers, asceticism, eroticism, and much more.