heteromorphic


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heteromorphic

, heteromorphous Biology
1. differing from the normal form in size, shape, and function
2. (of pairs of homologous chromosomes) differing from each other in size or form
3. (esp of insects) having different forms at different stages of the life cycle

heteromorphic

[¦hed·ə·rō′mȯr·fik]
(cell and molecular biology)
Having synoptic or sex chromosomes that differ in size or form.
(medicine)
Differing from the normal in size or morphology.
(zoology)
Having a different form at each stage of the life history.
References in periodicals archive ?
B) MN82943, with 2n=62, FN=99, with 19 pairs of biarmed and 10 pairs of acrocentric chromosomes, and a heteromorphic pair of small chromosomes; female individual, X chromosome as a medium autosomal.
The complement includes 10 bi-armed, 12 acrocentric pairs of autosomes and, occasionally, one heteromorphic (subtelocentric/acrocentric) large autosomal pair.
lucii coincide with the heteromorphic pair in the region of a secondary constriction, confirming that this is the nucleolus organizer region.
The structures were identified as heteromorphic deutonymphs of Hypodectes propus (Order Astigmata) of the family Hypoderatidae.
indica (Schumann, 1886; Scott, 1978; Verdoorn, 1981; Thulin, 1998) were: cymes heteromorphic, calyces unorderly, half (Scott, 1978) to none (Scott, 1978; Thulin, 1998) of the normal nearly completely fused stamen filament fusion lengths, a stipitate distended arcuate pistil, ovary abnormally shaped and stigma composite-nodular.
The Asteraceae presents higher heteromorphic species frequency among the plant families, due to the position of florets in inflorescence (Clavijo, 1995; Imbert, 2002).
2010)] in males, and other own observation (in Sutton's slides) that some individuals carried a heteromorphic autosomal pair: thus, both homologues could be microscopically identified according to size (Carothers 1913).
First, when one sees a liverwort, hornwort, or moss in the field or elsewhere, the observed specimen, with only a very few exceptions, represents the gametophyte (1n) phase of the organism's heteromorphic alternation of phases (or generations).
In Gagrella unicolor male meiosis the sex chromosomes are seen as one or two heteropycnotic bodies at early prophase I and as a heteromorphic pair from diplotene to metaphase I; furthermore they precede the migration of autosomes at both meiotic anaphases (Sharma and Dutta, 1959).
Meiotic complements of the three analyzed species of the family Bothriuridae contain no heteromorphic chromosome pair, which indicates the absence of heteromorphic sex chromosomes in males, as is also the case in Buthus occitanus (Amoreux 1789) and Pandinus imperator (C.