hickory


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Related to hickory: hickory tree

Hickory,

city (1990 pop. 28,301), Burke and Catawba counties, W N.C., at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mts.; inc. 1870. It is a processing and trade center for an abundant agricultural region (grain, soybeans, poultry, hogs, cattle, dairying). Manufactures include furniture; textiles and tape; stone, plastic, and metal products; electric and electronic equipment; optical fibers; and consumer goods. Tourism is also important, and Hickory is the seat of Lenoir-Rhyne College. In the city are the Hickory Museum of Art and the Catawba Science Center. The Hickory Motor Speedway is nearby.

hickory,

any plant of the genus Carya of the family Juglandaceae (walnutwalnut,
common name for some members of the Juglandaceae, a family of chiefly deciduous, resinous trees characterized by large and aromatic compound leaves. Species of the walnut family are indigenous mostly to the north temperate zone, but also range from Central America along
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 family); deciduous nut-bearing trees native to E North America and south to Central America except for a few species found in SE Asia. The pecan (C. illinoinensis) is one of the most important nut trees of the United States. This tree, the tallest of the hickories, is native from S Illinois through the Mississippi valley to central Texas and Mexico. A rich food (containing 70% or more fat), the pecan is the most popular American nut after the peanut and is used as a table delicacy, in ice cream, and for confectionery, especially the traditionally Southern pecan pies and pralines. Cultivated varieties with unusually thin shells, called paper-shelled pecans, have been developed, but wild pecans are also gathered and sold in quantity. Other hickories having edible nuts that are marketed to a lesser extent include the shagbark hickory (C. ovata) of the E United States, the shellbark hickory (C. laciniosa), chiefly of the Midwest and South, and the mockernut, or white, hickory (C. alba or C. tomentosa) of the E United States. The hickory nut of commerce is usually that of the shagbark (the names shagbark and shellbark are often used interchangeably), which has a relatively thin shell. Native Americans made a food of ground hickory nuts. The abundant oil or fat of the nuts was a staple article in the diets of both Native Americans and early colonists. The pignut (C. glabra) has small nuts of variable quality, usually bitter, that have been used as mast for fattening hogs. Many hickories have been so exploited for their valuable wood that they are in danger of extinction. The wood of several species is extremely hard, heavy, strong, and elastic. It is a preferred wood for golf clubs, wheel spokes, and tool handles and wherever strength and resilience are required. Prairie schooners often carried hickory sticks on their westward treks to replace broken wagon parts and ox yokes. The wood, used also for furniture, is prone to decay in moisture. Shagbark hickory is the most valuable for timber. Hickory is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Juglandales, family Juglandaceae.

hickory

A tough, hard, strong wood; has high shock resistance and high bending strength. See also: Douglas fir

hickory

[′hik·ə·rē]
(botany)
The common name for species of the genus Carya in the order Fagales; tall deciduous tree with pinnately compound leaves, solid pith, and terminal, scaly winter buds.

hickory

A tough, hard, strong wood of North America; has high shock resistance and high bending strength.

hickory

1. any juglandaceous tree of the chiefly North American genus Carya, having nuts with edible kernels and hard smooth shells
2. the hard tough wood of any of these trees
3. the nut of any of these trees
References in periodicals archive ?
Throughout the holidays, Hickory Farms will be donating $5 to No Kid Hungry each time a Signature Party Planner Gift Box is purchased.
Olde Hickory believes that great beer is the result of meticulous attention to detail throughout the brewing process.
Hickory will pilot the new Grasp-TripBAM automation solution, Grasp-TB Sync.
Sarah Reep, director of Designer Relations and Education at KraftMaid, described hickory as a beautiful wood with an active grain pattern.
The Hickory Street Substation rebuild was needed because of the advanced age of the equipment.
Satellite Hickory Students in Huddersfield schools are meeting Hickory the giant mouse, Eric the talking reindeer, and helping Mr Yonderly, an inventor, build a clock from lunar cheese.
While the black walnut trees are surrounded by nut pickers scrambling to get every nut, the shagbark hickory lives a quiet life in moist and somewhat open areas.
The homesite was purchased for $113,000 in March 2004 from Hickory Valley Ltd.
You can join us at the Tulip Time Scholarship Games and help crack and sample these hickory nuts.
Located in the Fairview community of Buncombe County, they are the fourth generation to farm the 600 acres of Hickory.
Neil, who plays off a handicap of five using present day technology, went back in time to show that it's not the clubs, but the player using them as he clinched the Scottish Hickory Championships.