high-energy electron diffraction

high-energy electron diffraction

[′hī ‚en·ər·jē i′lek‚trȧn di‚frak·shən]
(physics)
The diffraction of electrons with high energies, usually in the range of 30,000-70,000 electronvolts, mainly to study the structure of atoms and molecules in gases and liquids. Abbreviated HEED.
References in periodicals archive ?
A scanning reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) system is typically used to perform in situ monitoring of the layer-by-layer epitaxy.
Covering electron diffraction, photoemission, and alternative techniques, they look at reflection high-energy electron diffraction, inelastic scattering, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, ion-beam surface characterization of thin multicomponent films, spectroscopies combined with reflection high-energy electron diffraction, deposition vapor monitoring, and real-time studies of epitaxial film growth using surface X-ray diffraction.
In the early 1970s his group studied the corrosion and oxidation of nickel --thin oxide film formation using the unique combination of reflection high-energy electron diffraction and X-ray emission analysis, high-temperature oxidation, and the formation and breakdown of films in aqueous environments.
Part one covers electron diffraction techniques for in situ study of thin film growth, including chapters on topics such as reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and inelastic scattering techniques.

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