hippies


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hippies

1960s “dropouts of American culture” usually identified with very long hair adorned with flowers. [Popular Culture: Misc.]
See: Hair
References in periodicals archive ?
A lot of people would be weekend hippies in Scotland.
Hippies are not long-haired types living in communes but very brief swimming trunks.
Hippies weren't leaving quite as many dimes and quarters at the head shops either.
The Bedell guitar line has a history that extends back to the hippie era.
Shoot, if we can't laugh at our hippie reputation, then there's something wrong with our funny bones.
Call them freaks, the underground, the counterculture, flower children or hippies," writes Barry Miles in characteristic prose, they "transformed life in the West as we knew it, introducing a spirit of freedom, of hope, of happiness, of change and of revolution.
The little angels belted out pro-drug lyrics from a banned hit single as part of a sketch about hippies.
Less so was the other event that defined the summer of '69, the 350,000 hippies who, exactly one month later, materialized as if by magic in a muddy field in upstate New York for "Three Days of Peace and Music--An Aquarian Exposition": Woodstock.
Now we're bringing these pranksters and their timeless humor to the big screen in a movie that is certain to entertain hippies, ex-hippies, would-be hippies, and new and established audiences of all ages.
Dreher, to his great credit, is willing to put ideological rivalries aside, and acknowledge that certain ideas we've come to associate with tree-hugging hippies a proper reverence for the natural world, making do with less, resisting the dehumanizing conformity of mass culture are good ones, for both the soul and civilization.
Those dudes aren't hippies and they all skate for Element.
The point, Cain says, is not to make fun of hippies (Eugene, are you listening?