historical climate

historical climate

[hi′stär·ə·kəl ′klī·mət]
(climatology)
A climate of the historical period (the past 7000 years).
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These observations, together with computer model simulations and historical climate reconstructions from ice cores, ocean sediments and tree rings all provide strong evidence that the majority of the warming over the past century is a result of human activities.
Task 1: Review available data on hazard, exposure and vulnerability required to conduct a road network vulnerability assessment - gather all available current and historical climate, geological, geotechnical, hydrological, seismological about the main road network of the Federation Bosnia and Herzegovina.
We attribute this heterogeneity to historical climate adaptation.
The study's lead author, Ning Lin of Princeton, combined the historical climate data with computer models of future climate conditions and storm surges to project future sea levels and storm intensities.
A staging area can be determined using historical climate data to identify problem areas such as those with patterns of heavy flooding.
Furthermore, the structural uncertainty is estimated, in part, by comparing the model with other models in hindcasting historical climate change.
For instance, the writers/editors note they 'selected excerpts which [they] felt advanced the central narrative of the struggle for self-determination, as well as others which shed light onto the broader historical climate of the period, such as details concerning protective legislation, nascent child removal and assimilation policies' (p.
Shaun Lovejoy of McGill University in Montreal had previously developed a statistical methodology that used pre-industrial temperature proxies to analyse historical climate patterns.
The index used the minimum and maximum temperatures from 1860-2005 to define the bounds of historical climate variability at any given location.
A primary point of the above discussion has been to note the richness of climate phenomena, and the fact that placing this subject into the public sphere because of policy objectives has forced a highly oversimplified definition of the terms of reference, which largely exclude the most interesting examples of historical climate change.

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