histrionism


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histrionism

[′his·trē·ə‚niz·əm]
(psychology)
Dramatic affect, associated with some psychoneuroses and psychoses.
References in periodicals archive ?
But this carnivalized difference of the Neronian self that emerges in public histrionic stance translates, in fact, the collective psychodrama of the Roman world which liberates through the sequence of the Neronian histrionism the own difference carnivalized by the self through histrionic Neronian own self by the collision of two mentalitary infrastructures, one centered on civitas (the organization of the Roman world around the city) and one more off-center, eccentric: "But for these interior and moral frontiers to persist, there was need of another border, that external, material and institutional one: the city of Rome.
The forming of the taste for histrionism doubles the deformation of the character of young Nero, Suetonius suggesting a co-substantiality between cultivating the spectacular pleasures and the versatility pushed to monstrosity: "Quite young, before he even got out of childhood, he regularly took part as an actor, to the circus and Trojan games, winning the public's sympathy.
The personality pattern that helps to predict the highest number of communication styles is histrionism.
This occurs due to a necessity of reconciling the opposition between the "arrogance of reason" and the "ecstatic intuition," qualifying the refusal of those writers who "prefer having it understood that they compose by a species of fine frenzy" as symptomatic of literary histrionism (Poe 2003: 431).
There he was, the old Charmer, the Actor, with his practised rhetoric, his histrionisms, his emotional appeal--and all the patients were convulsed with laughter.