hoe


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hoe,

usually a flat blade, variously shaped, set in a long wooden handle and used primarily for weeding and for loosening the soil. It was the first distinctly agricultural implement. The earliest hoes were forked sticks. Heavy flaked-stone implements mounted with bitumen were used in Mesopotamia in the 5th millennium B.C. They occur together with flint-bladed sickles and grinding stones—all of which are indications of farming settlements. Hoe blades were made of animal antlers and scapulae, or shoulder blades, and of shells. Variations on the hoe, such as the pick, the adz, and the plowplow
or plough,
agricultural implement used to cut furrows in and turn up the soil, preparing it for planting. The plow is generally considered the most important tillage tool.
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, appeared as the blade progressed from stone to copper, bronze, iron, and steel. Modern garden hoes are of two types, the drag hoe and the thrust hoe. Truck farms use light scraping hoes, chopping hoes, and multibladed hoes, and in large-scale agriculture a cultivating implement called a rotary hoe is used for weeding. The hoe symbolizes the garden horticulture that sustained high civilizations, such as those of pre-Columbian America.

Bibliography

See M. Partridge, Farm Tools Through the Ages (1973).

Hoe

 

(in Russian, motyga; also motyka, sapka, tsapka, and tiapka), a manual agricultural tool for loosening the soil and killing weeds. It consists of a working element and a wooden handle set perpendicular to it. Hoes appeared in the early farming cultures of the Neolithic period (at first in Southwest Asia, and then, with the spread of agriculture, in other countries). The working part of early hoes was made of hard wood, rock, bone, horn, and carapaces of turtles; those of modern hoes are made of steel. With the appearance of plowing implements, hoes came to be used primarily in caring for growing plants. Only among certain peoples in the tropical forest zones of Africa and South-east Asia do they continue to be used as the primary implement for tillage.

hoe

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(design engineering)
An implement consisting of a long handle with a thin, flat, straight-edged blade attached transversely to the end; used for cultivating and weeding.

backhoe

backhoe attachment on a crane
An excavating machine for cutting trenches; a boom-mounted bucket moves toward the machine, cutting the ground like a hoe; then the machine turns away from the cut to permit the operator to dump the soil.
References in classic literature ?
He held a hoe in his hand, and, while Phoebe was gone in quest of the crumbs, had begun to busy himself with drawing up fresh earth about the roots of the tomatoes.
If you brought no hoe from your Swazi home, surely we will buy you one.
As for its legs, the right was a hoe handle, and the left an undistinguished and miscellaneous stick from the woodpile.
Corn will not grow unless it is planted and manured; but the farmer will not plant or hoe it unless the chances are a hundred to one that he will cut and harvest it.
Every child that was large enough to carry a hoe was put to work, and the baby--for usually there was at least one baby--would be laid down at the end of the cotton row, so that its mother could give it a certain amount of attention when she had finished chopping her row.
those poor morsels of land we used to weed and rake and hoe, my boy and I
I did not know who I was and when I grew big enough to work, the Witch made me wait upon her and carry wood for the fire and hoe in the garden.
I have a huge pile of letters to answer, so I must gird up the loins of my mind and hoe in.
The big man leaned upon his hoe and looked up at her.
Shortly after the accession of King James, Jonson, Chapman, and Marston brought out a comedy, 'Eastward Hoe,' in which they offended the king by satirical flings at the needy Scotsmen to whom James was freely awarding Court positions.
The faultily constructed plowshares in use in some parts of France were unknown here, the hoe sufficed for the little field work that they did.
I put no manure whatever on this land, not being the owner, but merely a squatter, and not expecting to cultivate so much again, and I did not quite hoe it all once.