hog


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hog:

see swineswine,
name for any of the cloven-hoofed mammals of the family Suidae, native to the Old World. A swine has a rather long, mobile snout, a heavy, relatively short-legged body, a thick, bristly hide, and a small tail.
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hog

[häg]
(agriculture)
A domestic swine.
(computer science)
A computer program that uses excessive computer resources, such as memory or processing power, or requires excessive time to execute.

hog

1. a domesticated pig, esp a castrated male weighing more than 102 kg
2. US and Canadian any artiodactyl mammal of the family Suidae; pig
3. Nautical a stiff brush, for scraping a vessel's bottom
4. Nautical the amount or extent to which a vessel is hogged
5. Slang chiefly US a large powerful motorcycle

hog

(1)
Favoured term to describe programs or hardware that seem to eat far more than their share of a system's resources, especially those which noticeably degrade interactive response. *Not* used of programs that are simply extremely large or complex or that are merely painfully slow themselves (see pig, run like a). More often than not encountered in qualified forms, e.g. "memory hog", "core hog", "hog the processor", "hog the disk". "A controller that never gives up the I/O bus gets killed after the bus-hog timer expires."

hog

(2)
Also said of *people* who use more than their fair share of resources (particularly disk, where it seems that 10% of the people use 90% of the disk, no matter how big the disk is or how many people use it). Of course, once disk hogs fill up one file system, they typically find some other new one to infect, claiming to the sysadmin that they have an important new project to complete.

hog

A program that uses an excessive amount of computer resources, such as memory or disk, or takes a long time to execute.
References in classic literature ?
He had dressed hogs himself in the forest of Lithuania; but he had never expected to live to see one hog dressed by several hundred men.
The chutes into which the hogs went climbed high up--to the very top of the distant buildings; and Jokubas explained that the hogs went up by the power of their own legs, and then their weight carried them back through all the processes necessary to make them into pork.
Here was the chute, with its river of hogs, all patiently toiling upward; there was a place for them to rest to cool off, and then through another passageway they went into a room from which there is no returning for hogs.
Neither squeals of hogs nor tears of visitors made any difference to them; one by one they hooked up the hogs, and one by one with a swift stroke they slit their throats.
First there were the "splitters," the most expert workmen in the plant, who earned as high as fifty cents an hour, and did not a thing all day except chop hogs down the middle.
In the end, as with the hogs, the finished beef was run into the chilling room, to hang its appointed time.
If a hog, go join your fellow-swine in the sty; if a lion, a wolf, a tiger, go howl with the wild beasts on the lawn; if a fox, go exercise your craft in stealing poultry.
Uttering these last words, she waved her wand; and stamping her foot imperiously, each of the guests was struck aghast at beholding, instead of his comrades in human shape, one and twenty hogs sitting on the same number of golden thrones.
The door of the saloon being flung open, the drove of hogs ran in all directions save the right one, in accordance with their hoggish perversity, but were finally driven into the back yard of the palace.
There were about fifty of these unclean beasts in the whole herd; and though the greater part were hogs by birth and education, there was wonderfully little difference to be seen betwixt them and their new brethren, who had so recently worn the human shape.
The nymph with the bodice of oaken bark (she was the hamadryad of an oak) threw a handful of acorns among them; and the two and twenty hogs scrambled and fought for the prize, as if they had tasted not so much as a noggin of sour milk for a twelvemonth.
150 in money, then a sloop load of horses, cows, hogs, and stores'; and so on to the thumb again.