homespun


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homespun

1. cloth made at home or made of yarn spun at home
2. a cloth resembling this but made on a power loom

homespun

[′hōm‚spən]
(textiles)
A general term for cloth handwoven at home instead of in a mill such as the linsey-woolsey, butternut, and coarse flannels made on handlooms by early American settlers.
Coarse fabrics woven from linen or cotton, for example, drapery fabrics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Homespun Style by Selina Lake and Joanna Simmons with photography by Debi Treloar is published by Ryland Peters & Small, priced pounds 19.
OriGENal Voice is a tight compilation of homespun musicians like Patty Griffin, Blues Traveler, Sheryl Crow and a bunch of best-kept-secret musical artists from Austin, Texas.
There are very few black people doing this," says Johnson, 33, of Silver Spring, Maryland, "These are authentic, homespun programs that are not pre-packaged corporate products or gimmicks.
Objects that Isamu Noguchi's original sets merely suggested, such as a rocking chair or a large stone, are more realistic and the dancers' costumes more homespun than the 1944 designs.
Embedded in the homespun and universal sayings in this new book is a wonderful story of the lives of two strong women, specifically how the wisdom of the older woman shaped the life of the younger.
She could fathom and depict in her work the immensity of creation in a homespun style reminiscent of what Willa Cather once called "that irregular and intimate quality of things made entirely by the human hand" (2).
Printed on paper with a homespun appearance, the illustrations capture the essence of the colonial era and Revere's importance to American history.
What I didn't expect was that, in spite of these associations, this ecotourism lodge is a homespun business in every sense of the word.
The founder and CEO of Anne McKevitt Ideas is England's glammed-up, carrot-topped retort to Stewart's subtle earth tones and painstaking homespun.
Transforming our homespun notions of pickling into "not the norm" appetizers or entree items, with full intentions of evoking grandmother's recipes of years gone by, is hardly a new concept; however, it is one that continually challenges chefs to integrate both the classic and innovative in their dishes.