homeworking


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homeworking

a form of remunerated labour undertaken within the home. In the pre-factory era of manufacture, items would be delivered to households (the ‘putting out’ system) for further processing, and collected when this had been completed. In Europe, the practice continued after the introduction of factories, but probably declined until the late 20th-century when it was revived, especially with the introduction of more flexible patterns of production. In many contemporary Asian and Latin American countries, homeworking is very common, with parts of the production process contracted out. Its attraction for modern firms is that homeworkers (often women) represented a flexible and cheap labour force. Factory overhead costs are also reduced. Homeworking or ‘outwork’ should not be confused with DOMESTIC LABOUR. see also DOMESTIC PRODUCTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on the table, the percentage of more than 50% were taken and feasibility study, preliminary cost estimate, cost planning, elemental cost estimate, measurement/ taking off, bills of quantity preparation, cost analysis are the types of work from the pre-contract stage that can be done by the employees who homeworking.
Shaun Smith (left) and Craig Bradley could face a pounds 6m compensation order including their Porsche and BMW cars for their homeworking scam
Even now, though, many companies are still reluctant to encourage homeworking for a variety of reasons: the sense that staff would not work as hard; the fear that teamwork would suffer; the increased difficulty in directing and managing staff; problems of staff evaluation; and the cost associated with ensuring that remote employees were properly equipped to do their jobs.
The literature on homeworking has addressed the problems in two ways.
They use data from the Spring 1998 LFS and from aggregated data from four quarterly surveys to address questions about homeworkers' reliance on information technology (ICTs), the link between homeworking and absolute and relative low pay, gender and ethnicity in homeworking and the extent of childcare amongst homeworkers.
Past issues of Women'space have covered such diverse topics as Y2K, rural women, grief resources, homeworking for disabled women, homeschooling, restorative justice, the Internet and the global prostitution industry, First Nations on the net, online anti-poverty organizing, menstruation, antiracism and the Internet, women's spirituality, anarchist feminism, designing a website, fighting globalization, using search tools, halting online abuse, a women's online university, and alternative therapies for breast cancer.
A TRADING standards chief has called on the Whack to ask newsagents across the country to display a notice in windows declaring that they will NOT accept adverts for homeworking or envelope addressing schemes.
Many are relying on business center providers and hybrid satellite offices to take up the slack and put back lost amenities as they strive to adjust to homeworking and mobile working.
This has been made possible by both organisations adopting an attitude focused on improvement in the homeworking arena.
The top UAE travel trends were unveiled by the Dubai-based branch of global homeworking company, Travel Counsellors, at the My Travel Counsellors' Conference last month, provided insight into the key booking patterns and destination preferences of its discerning customers.
Mr Porter added: "The workplace is changing, and many businesses are recognising the benefits of homeworking.