homocentric


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homocentric

[‚häm·ə′sen·trik]
(optics)
Pertaining to rays which have the same focal point, or which are parallel. Also known as stigmatic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both terms may be too homocentric, that is, give inadequate attention to ethical obligations to life forms other than our own.
However, it is important to recall here that the homocentric value-orientation of Semitic religions was first formulated in Palestine as early as the 9th century, BC, but it was put into practice in Europe only after twenty-five centuries, when Western science emerged in the 17th century AD.
This work examines Aristotle's cosmology, offers a reappraisal of his ideas about the composition of the heavens, and thoroughly discusses his theory of homocentric spheres.
What you were saying about the nature of the change that took place in the West during the Renaissance is, after all, a significant historical development that has affected the course of Western civilization to such an extent that to ask for such a radical change--the kind of change you are suggesting--is to ask for a total re-orientation of the belief system--from homocentric to theomorphic, and that may be too much.
In reviving the medieval astronomer Alpetragius' homocentric theory, "whose inadequacies seem to have been recognized by everyone but him" (174-75), Bacon stood alone.
Both laced cheeky homocentric imagery into otherwise harmless, if wildly infectious, pop music masterminded by fiber-producer Trevor Horn.
Opposing this assimilationist position are the gay and lesbian liberationists inspired by the long tradition of homocentric theories and visions such as seen in the works of Plato, Sappho, Karl Ulrichs, Magnus Hirschfeld, Walt Whitman and the late Harry Hay.
133 (1996) (rejecting a homocentric view of nature).
Gregory Vlastos argues that Plato was the first to assume that the movement of the planets could be explained by a number of homocentric circular revolutions into different directions.
Miller spends half of his book-length essay on the Broadway musical, Place for Us, on a fascinating, homocentric analysis of Gypsy, detailing his own ardent identification with the character he insists on calling Boy Louise.