Homogamy


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homogamy

[hə′mäg·ə·mē]
(biology)
Inbreeding due to isolation.
(botany)
Condition of having all flowers alike.

Homogamy

 

(1) The simultaneous maturation of the stigma and anthers in a bisexual flower, which makes self-fertilization possible.

(2) An antiquated genetic term (suggested by the English biologist K. Pearson in 1903) indicating selection of similar pairs for crossing.

(3) Transmission by male and female individuals of the same combinations of genes.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Lammers (1999), "Occupational Homogamy in Eight Countries of the European Union, 1975-89", Acta Sociologica, vol.
Thus, we can deduce from the above data that families comprised of Han mothers are more prone to integration and assimilation than those with Hui mothers, and hence homogamy is a significant instrument for keeping ethnic cultural values intact and for handing down to the next generations their native religious and cultural traits.
This study aims to investigate matrimonial strategy among Chaouis by exploring different types of assortative mating: consanguinity, endogamy and social homogamy (cultural and professional) in order to establish the Chaouis family structure.
That is, just as spouses have increasingly similar incomes (marital homogamy is rising), so too neighborhoods are becoming increasingly homogeneous by income (residential segregation is rising).
Van Poppel, Frans, Aart Laefbroer yjeroen Vermunt (2001), "Love, Necessity and Opportunity: Changing Patterns of Marital Age Homogamy in the Netherlands, 1850-1993", Population Studies, vol.
The role of personality and intelligence according to the results of this present study, is genuine which, in turn, invalidates the idea that the social homogamy hypothesis can explain similarities in personality and intelligence between members of a couple.
1998) "Marital Homogamy in the United States: The Influence of Individual and Paternal Education".
Numerous studies at the individual, social psychological level, for example, have documented the influence of homogamy in mate selection and marriage, indicating that religiously homogamous couples have more successful marriages than "mixed couples" and are less apt to divorce (Call and Heaton, 1997; Heaton and Pratt, 1990; Ortega et al.
Consistent with marital homogamy, the mean age of the men is 36.
Morris, Configuring the Bo(u)nds of Marriage: The Implications of Hawaiian Culture & Values for the Debate About Homogamy, 8 YALE J.
The influence of religious stability and homogamy on the relationship between religiosity and alcohol use among Protestants.
The theory of homogamy is suggested as an explanation for the findings.