homogeneous nucleation


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homogeneous nucleation

[‚hō·mə¦jē·nē·əs ‚nü·klē′a·shən]
(physical chemistry)
The process of creation of vapor bubble nuclei in a superheated liquid away from bounding walls and in the absence of any foreign material.
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For this reason, the cell density is frequently controlled by introducing a nucleating agent such as talc [6], Thus, a homogeneous nucleation predominates at high gas content in the solution and a heterogeneous process takes place at low gas concentration [7], whereby the main nucleation centers can be represented not only by foreign particles but also by some elements of the polymer structure.
These photographs clearly indicate the role of the stereocomplex as a nucleating agent, and the crystallization of a pure PLLA was initiated in instantaneous homogeneous nucleation.
They consider such aspects as the kinetics and thermodynamics of fluctuation-induced transitions in multistable systems, confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering, the role of metastable intermediate states in the homogeneous nucleation of solids from solution, geometric constraints in the self-assembly of mineral dendrites and platelets, and the ability of silica to induce a biomimetic crystallization of calcium carbonate.
There are two forms of nucleation: homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation.
The nucleation theory can be grouped under two categories: homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation.
From classical nucleation theory (Mullin, 2001), the rate of homogeneous nucleation, J, in bulk crystallization, i.
Homogeneous nucleation of bubbles requires extremely high supersaturation because there is a kinetic barrier to nucleation; therefore, the magma must rise in the conduit above the volatile saturation level before bubbles can form (Fig.
Since these are like substances, homogeneous nucleation occurs and the liquid builds up, forming droplets that flow into a flux collection jar for removal.
The second question implies other sources of particle formation, typically homogeneous nucleation, which can result in both [N.
There are natural homogeneous nucleation sites in the metal and others (heterogeneous nucleation sites) that are the result of inoculation.