homonym

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Related to homonymic: homophonic

homonym

Biology a name for a species or genus that should be unique but has been used for two or more different organisms
References in periodicals archive ?
Trinculo's joke represents the kind of homonymic pun that Antonio and Sebastian contrived, and his utterance of it associates the common jester with the courtiers in Alonso's party.
xi) A son of a Central Asian immigrant family named An Jingou, whose name was but a homonymic euphemism for "golden dog" (DH, 194).
Occasionally, a homonymic error can create a useful new phrase, as in this report from the business pages of a British daily: "John Lewis is not mutually owned in the same way as building societies.
Geeraerts [1983] further distinguishes between conceptual efficiency [metaphor, metonymy], formal efficiency [ellipsis, folk-etymology, avoidance of homonymic clash], (11) conceptual expressivity [word formation, borrowing, semantic change], formal expressivity [creation of specific word-formation patterns].
In any event, the symbolic investments of "The Rime" seem nowhere harder to read past than in Coleridge's invocations of the Crucifixion in his account of the killing of the Albatross: in addition to the cross-bow as an instrument of death, there is a homonymic glance at the Resurrection, arguably, in the lines "Ne dim ne red, like God's own head, / The glorious sun uprist" (93-94), the crew substituting the Albatross for a crucifix, the spirit voice mentioning "him who died on cross," and several other touches.
This is why, whenever several words occur in one or the same acoustic or graphic form, whenever a homophonic or homonymic effect occurs, translation in the strict, traditional, and dominant sense of the terms encounters an insurmountable limit --and the beginning of its end, the figure of its ruin .
At the risk of subsidizing too heavily the significance of the homonymic connection between 'here' as location and 'hear' as audition, I would like to suggest that this pun stands at the threshold to a poetics of romance mistiming and misplacement.
In this vein Claudio Povolo's new book unravels in exquisite detail the vendetta background to a single sensational case, the 1605 investigation of the aristocrat Paolo Orgiano on multiple charges of raping and sodomizing young women and assaulting their male relatives in his homonymic village.
Less romantic, but more to the point would have been the homonymic "To Her, tentatively," for this female figure who remains unnamed throughout the novel wields a literary sword of Damocles above the author's head.
Surely, "le sens du vide" would have been more normal here, but would not have permitted the homonymic reading of "l'essence du vide.
But with chapters on Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and King Lear, Berry covers much fruitful ground, most especially in her chapter on Lear, if one can overlook Berry's frequent citation of "the hidden pun," "an unspok en play," "a homonymic affinity," "homophony," and "buried association" (127, 41, 42, 54, 95), the fruit of reading Berry's book is worth sifting through its methodological chaff.
Borgmann's homonymic word-pairs with no shared letters (I/EYE is another example) have etymological counterparts.