homophone


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homophone

a written letter or combination of letters that represents the same speech sound as another
References in periodicals archive ?
The CoST's linguistic features account for the likelihood that students in the middle and upper primary school years may be encouraged to experiment with complex polysyllabic words and homophones when they engage in the craft of writing, and that phonological, orthographic and morphological processing may be subsequently affected.
For instance, most students have few problems (or none) with homophones, but a single participant accounted for 14 of the 20 incorrect transcriptions that were noticed in this area, potentially skewing the overall result.
transformation-texts not governed by a constraint (such as the homophone games);
First, eggcorns usually involve homophones or near homophones, (19) compared to malapropisms, which usually involve similar (not identical) sounding words.
Such homophones have ever since been termed 'mondegreens' and 'Er Outdoors is naturally susceptible to the odd unarticulated pronunciation: for years she thought Creedence Clearwater Revival's Bad Moon Rising ended each verse with "there's a bathroom on the right" instead of "there's a bad moon on the rise".
0], speaking matrix of the homophone leads to the A(ssociation) matrix that the child constructs during the learning phase as shown in (5), which again leads to the same [P.
Participants were instructed to respond with the first associated word that came to mind after hearing the homophone.
In other quotes he changed the homophone "shoo" into "shoe" as a play on words.
I'm no homophone, but ye know, lick, it's a sad state of affairs when it seems there's more people in this city lifting shirts than making them.
already a familiar homophone of Morus or Moor (opposed to the candidus,
Assoumou Mba, former director of Agriculture of Cameroon, a country which, because of its past mandate status resulting from being a former German colony prior to the Great War, is both homophone and francophone.
In the case of a number of discs being required, I would produce an oversized master vinyl, and a quantity of pressed shellac discs would be made in London, by British Homophone.