hoodoo


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

hoodoo

1. a variant of voodoo
2. (in the western US and Canada) a strangely shaped column of rock
References in periodicals archive ?
Hoodoo has done "an exceptional job" managing 85 campgrounds in the Deschutes National Forest, said Ronda Bishop, the forest's special use administrator for concessions and resorts.
Both Hoodoo and American Land and Leisure are big concessionaires that know their business, and they can submit well-prepared bids for permits.
We're still sitting here with our fingers crossed," Hoodoo general manager Matthew McFarland said Monday afternoon.
Viewing conjuration, indeed all black religion, as fetishistic and therefore primitive, conjurers--root-doctors and hoodoo men--appear to hime only as practitioners of witchcraft.
So the Forest Service granted Thurston a permit to set up his rope tow, powered by an automobile engine, in the "bowl" at the base of a cinder cone named Hoodoo Butte.
As we have seen, a more liberating understanding of nature for Hurston would be the pluralism of African-based folk religions like hoodoo and voodoo, with their multiplicity of different loas, gods, and spirits, all in tune with different aspects of the natural world.
In his program to demystify these myths and legends glorifying whiteness as a symbol of racial superiority, Reed employs two more hoodoo words with striking effectiveness.
In Reed's writing Atibon-Legba is reconfigured as the hoodoo detective Papa LaBas in Mumbo Jumbo and The Last Days of Louisiana Red, and Fox cogently interprets LaBas as a North American version of the Haitian Papa Legba, a "New World incarnation of the Fon divinity Legba.
Cambridge failed to beat their Field Mill hoodoo as John Doolan's early penalty kept Mansfield on course for the play-offs.
DEREK ADAMS hopes his local knowledge can help Hibs bury their Highland hoodoo in Inverness this weekend.
ABERDEEN goal hero Robbie Winters admitted revenge over Livingston in the Scottish Cup tasted all the sweeter for ending an unwelcome hoodoo.
As her ethnographic career progresses - particularly as conveyed in the second section of Mules and Men, which describes hoodoo practices in Louisiana - Hurston is able to "go native" successfully precisely because she already is native, by which I mean more than that she is simply a local.