hoopla


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hoopla

Brit a fairground game in which a player tries to throw a hoop over an object and so win it
References in periodicals archive ?
There is no waiting to borrow titles on hoopla digital since on-demand content can be enjoyed by multiple patrons simultaneously.
Over the past year we've grown our business and enhanced Hoopla Scoreboard's capabilities in order to meet increasing demand from customers, who want the measurable performance gains that business gamification can deliver.
Shaun McKinney, of Blackpool trading standards, said after the hearing: "Games of this kind might look like harmless fun, but this case proves that even a simple game of hoopla hides a background of criminality.
Dark Horse Comics titles and more are now available for patrons to access instantly on hoopla digital's app and online service via their smartphones, tablets and computers.
In 2003, she founded Alotta Hoopla, which brings hula hoop entertainment and education to venues across the state.
With all the hoopla in 2000 over Vermont-style civil unions, a lot of people may have missed a real same-sex wedding last September in Texas, of all places.
Will the hubbub, hoopla, and popping of corks accompanying the May 12 opening of Tate Modern (nee Bank-side) drown out the news that London is acquiring not just one, but two major new--or at least renewed--showcases for contemporary art?
Since it is a social force founded on odious falsehood of choice without consequence, it is perhaps not so surprising that its latest manifestations give the lie to the hoopla of 1999 as the end of the 20th-century, and the threshold of a bright new millennium.
Lost amid all the hoopla surrounding the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 (TRA '97) is the fact that it does not just contain tax reductions.
Despite all the hoopla, the Internet can provide accountants with a wide assortment of useful information via World Wide Web sites.
Paris -- Ranging from the multimedia hoopla heralding France's national holiday, Bastille Day, to the truly proletarian, the sheer tally of offerings (upward of 2,000) in France last summer attested to the cultural vitality of a nation otherwise struggling with unemployment, rural attrition, and racial strife.
Amid all the current hoopla surrounding the buckyball, the soccer-ball-shaped molecule from the fullerene family, chemists continue to wonder exactly how all of its 60 carbon atoms come together to make this elegant structure.