hoppit

hoppit

[′häp·ət]
(mining engineering)
A large bucket, usually up to about 80 cubic feet (2.3 cubic meters), used in shaft sinking for hoisting men, rock, materials, and tools. Also known as bowk; kibble; sinking bucket.
References in periodicals archive ?
Andrew Hoppit, of the Forestry Commission, said people should not try to get rid of caterpillar nests, adding: "Those in affected areas can help us by reporting sightings of the pest using the Tree Alert reporting tool on our website.
See Julian Hoppit, "Financial Crises in Eighteenth-Century England," The Economic History Review, New Series, 39, no.
14) The publication of pamphlets designed to influence legislative output was common in this period; see Julian Hoppit, 'The Context and Contours of British Economic Literature, 1660-1760', Historical Journal, 49 (2006), 92-7, 105-6; Andrew Sneddon, 'Legislating for Economic Development: Irish Fisheries as a Case Study in the Limitations of "Improvement"', in D.
13) For extended discussions on financial crises and English economic life, see Ashton, Fluctuations, and Hoppit, "Financial Crises.
org HOPPIT TO HOBBIT WEOLEY Castle Library at 76 Beckbury Road, B29 5HR, will have a dragon, Tolkien books and information on the city's most famous author until December 31.
But Stockton manager Tom Young revamped his line-up and tactics for the final fling - Luke Cole moving into attack - and after Dave Hoppit had clawed back a goal, Lewis Scott secured the villager's point with a shot from the edge of the box.
Un intento de reducir a sus justos terminos el impacto que tuviera la burbuja sobre la economia del pais en HOPPIT, J.
Julian Hoppit refers to the Irish and Scottish unions with England as "limited in scope and .
In my defence I have contacted my solicitors Messrs Quick, Run and Hoppit who have advised me to take no action.
Stokes (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics (Oxford University Press, 2007); Thomas Babington Macaulay, History of England from the Accession of James II (1849; Penguin Classics, 2006);Tim Harris, Revolution: The Great Crisis of British Monarchy 1685-1720 (Penguin, 2007); Julian Hoppit, Land of Liberty?
In addition, a number of high profile members from the media have also served as judges, including Helen Shield (International Homes Magazine), Phil Spencer (Channel 4), Samantha Braniff (Sydney Morning Herald), Graham Norwood (Daily Mail), Jill Keene (Homes Magazine) and David Hoppit, a property writer.
But even if they were, today's PC Hoppit would not be able to run after them.