Horror


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Horror

Addams
Charles (1912— ) famed cartoonist of the macabre. [Am. Comics: NCE, 19]
Bhairava
(m), Bhairav (f) terrible forms of Shiva and spouse. [Hindu Myth.: Parrinder, 44]
Black Death, the
plague whose unprecedented mortality was incomprehensible to medieval mind. [Eur. Hist.: Bishop, 379–382]
Bosch, Hieronymus
(c. 1450–1516) paintings contain grotesque representations of evil and temptation. [Art Hist.: Osborne, 149]
Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, The
thrilling horror story told by a madman. [Ger. Cinema: Halliwell, 119]
Danse Macabre
Saint-Saëns’ musical depiction of a dance of the dead. [Music Hist.: Thompson, 1906]
Disasters of War
Goya’s violent protest against French occupation of Spain. [Art. Hist.: Osborne, 497]
Dracula, Count
vampire terrifies Transylvanian peasants and London circle. [Br. Lit.: Dracula]
dragonwort
traditional representation of horror. [Flower Symbolism: Jobes, 469]
Exorcist, The
supernatural horror story about a girl possessed by the devil (1974). [Am. Cinema: Halliwell, 247]
Jaws
box office sensation about a killer shark (1975). [Am. Cinema: Halliwell, 380]
mandrake
traditional representation of horror. [Plant Symbol-ism: Flora Symbolica, 175]
Phantom of the Opera, The
story of an angry, disfigured composer who haunts the sewers beneath the Paris Opera House. [Am. Cinema: Halliwell, 562]
Pit and the Pendulum, The
study in bone-chilling terror. [Am. Lit.: “The Pit and the Pendulum” in Portable Poe, 154–173]
Psycho
Hitchcock’s classic horror film. [Am. Cinema: NCE, 1249]
snakesfoot
indicates shocking occurrence. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 177]
Tell-Tale Heart, The
mad murderer dismembers victim, mistakes ticking watch for dead man’s heart, and confesses. [Am. Lit.: Poe The Tell-Tale Heart]
References in classic literature ?
Kory-Kory, who had been a little in advance of me, attracted by the exclamations of the chiefs, turned round in time to witness the expression of horror on my countenance.
by a cry, at first muffled and broken, like the sobbing of a child, and then quickly swelling into one long, loud, and continuous scream, utterly anomalous and inhuman - a howl - a wailing shriek, half of horror and half of triumph, such as might have arisen only out of hell, conjointly from the throats of the dammed in their agony and of the demons that exult in the damnation.
I now observed -- with what horror it is needless to say -- that its nether extremity was formed of a crescent of glittering steel, about a foot in length from horn to horn; the horns upward, and the under edge evidently as keen as that of a razor.
His vesture was dabbled in blood--and his broad brow, with all the features of the face, was besprinkled with the scarlet horror.
I must live on--as I have lived--alone, and, in addition, bear with other woes the memory of this latest insult and horror.
And the horror that had seized her when she touched him and convinced herself that that was not he, but something mysterious and horrible, seized her again.
The thought that these human fiends would devour him when the dance was done caused him not a single qualm of horror or disgust.
It but increased her horror of these great brains that were beyond the possibility of human emotions.
So frozen with horror was she that she could utter no sound, but the fixed and terrified gaze of her fear-widened eyes spoke as plainly to Clayton as words.
There was something in your face when the man staggered back, a kind of horror almost.
Her horror of entering Geoffrey's room, by herself, was insurmountable.
It is not, perhaps, easy for a reader, who hath never been in those circumstances, to imagine the horror with which darkness, rain, and wind, fill persons who have lost their way in the night; and who, consequently, have not the pleasant prospect of warm fires, dry cloaths, and other refreshments, to support their minds in struggling with the inclemencies of the weather.