horse chestnut


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Wikipedia.
Related to horse chestnut: horse chestnut tree

horse chestnut,

common name for some members of the Hippocastanaceae, a family of trees and shrubs of the north temperate zones and of South America. The horse chestnut tree, Aesculus hippocastanum, a native of the Balkan peninsula, is now cultivated in many countries for shade and ornament. Buckeyes are several similar but often smaller North American species of the same genus. Horse chestnuts and buckeyes (as the nuts too are called) somewhat resemble true chestnuts in appearance but are edible only after careful preparation. Some Native Americans ate buckeyes in large quantity after thorough roasting or leaching. Buckeyes, with their eyelike markings, are still carried as charms by some rural people. Ohio is called the Buckeye State from the prevalence of the Ohio buckeye, A. glabra. The wood of the horse chestnut and of the buckeye is soft; it has been used for paper pulp and for carpentry, woodenware, and other similar purposes. A compound derived from the buckeye, aesculin, is a pharmaceutical used as an anti-inflammatory. The only other genus of the family is Billia, evergreens ranging from Colombia to Mexico. Horse chestnuts are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
..... Click the link for more information.
, class Magnoliopsida, order Sapindales, family Hippocastanallae.

horse chestnut

[′hȯrs ¦ches·nət]
(botany)
Aesculus hippocastanum. An ornamental buckeye tree in the order Sapindales, usually with seven leaflets per leaf and resinous buds.

horse chestnut

1. any of several trees of the genus Aesculus, esp the Eurasian A. hippocastanum, having palmate leaves, erect clusters of white, pink, or red flowers, and brown shiny inedible nuts enclosed in a spiky bur: family Hippocastanaceae
2. the nut of this tree
References in periodicals archive ?
In the controversial conker article, headlined Bonkers Head Bans Conkers, he said: "There is a place for horse chestnuts.
The active ingredient in horse chestnut seeds is a chemical called escin.
Preparing to bring down the 119-foot horse chestnut which had become a danger on the Glyn Estate The WildeWood team who felled the tree
Our previous studies showed significant growth and multiplication, as well as simple nutritive demands of androgenic embryos [14] and horse chestnut hairy roots [15].
A heavy infestation may cause trees to struggle to produce enough nutrients to grow goodsized horse chestnuts.
A systematic review identified 13 trials evaluating standardized preparations of horse chestnut seed extract for CVI.
Many studies have documented symptomatic benefits of horse chestnut seed extract for chronic venous insufficiency.
The wood from the European horse chestnut is creamy white and can be used for general turnery, carving, furniture and cabinetry.
Bio-flavonoids, found in vitamin C complex, horse chestnut extract (with standardized escin), and horsetail also have a diuretic effect.
Yellow Wood White Ash Catalpa Box Eider Weeping Willow Stag Horn Sumac Japanese Maple Serbian Spruce Hemlock Red Horse Chestnut Black Cherry Crabapple Red Oak White Oak Chestnut Oak Ginkgo Hawthorn Silver Maple Hickory Redbud Dogwood Honey Locust Sweetgum Hackberry Slippery Elm London Plane Red Mulberry Grey Birch Paper Birch Juniper
Horse chestnut extracts possess antiinflammatory properties, while soapnut derivatives yield an expectorant.
Since 2002, the number of horse chestnut trees affected by the leaf miner moth has increased significantly across the UK.