horse chestnut


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Related to horse chestnut: horse chestnut tree

horse chestnut,

common name for some members of the Hippocastanaceae, a family of trees and shrubs of the north temperate zones and of South America. The horse chestnut tree, Aesculus hippocastanum, a native of the Balkan peninsula, is now cultivated in many countries for shade and ornament. Buckeyes are several similar but often smaller North American species of the same genus. Horse chestnuts and buckeyes (as the nuts too are called) somewhat resemble true chestnuts in appearance but are edible only after careful preparation. Some Native Americans ate buckeyes in large quantity after thorough roasting or leaching. Buckeyes, with their eyelike markings, are still carried as charms by some rural people. Ohio is called the Buckeye State from the prevalence of the Ohio buckeye, A. glabra. The wood of the horse chestnut and of the buckeye is soft; it has been used for paper pulp and for carpentry, woodenware, and other similar purposes. A compound derived from the buckeye, aesculin, is a pharmaceutical used as an anti-inflammatory. The only other genus of the family is Billia, evergreens ranging from Colombia to Mexico. Horse chestnuts are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Sapindales, family Hippocastanallae.

horse chestnut

[′hȯrs ¦ches·nət]
(botany)
Aesculus hippocastanum. An ornamental buckeye tree in the order Sapindales, usually with seven leaflets per leaf and resinous buds.

horse chestnut

1. any of several trees of the genus Aesculus, esp the Eurasian A. hippocastanum, having palmate leaves, erect clusters of white, pink, or red flowers, and brown shiny inedible nuts enclosed in a spiky bur: family Hippocastanaceae
2. the nut of this tree
References in periodicals archive ?
The National Woodland Inventory of Woodland Trees estimates there are 470,000 horse chestnut trees in Great Britain, around 11,100 of them in Wales.
Anthers were obtained from the 100-year-old horse chestnut tree ([N.
The remaining five studies compared horse chestnut seed extract against a reference medication [0-([beta]-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides].
The wood from the European horse chestnut is creamy white and can be used for general turnery, carving, furniture and cabinetry.
Q: I have diverticulosis and would like to take Venastat, a leg-health dietary supplement containing sustained release pellets of horse chestnut seed.
Horse chestnut trees across the UK have been disfigured by the larvae of Cameraria ohridella - better known as the leaf miner moth.
Now Professor Hugh Evans, who leads the project for Forest Research in Wales, says the horse chestnut tree itself is in jeopardy because the leaf miner bug disfigures horse chestnut tree leaves as it feeds by "mining" inside them, causing the leaves to go brown in mid or late summer.
A strong horse chestnut twig placed in a jam jar takes pride of place - its sticky buds just beginning to burst.
The number of insects that pollinate the horse chestnut trees were down this spring and the trees' flowers were lost due to heavy rain.
Hunting around the base of horse chestnut trees, chucking sticks upwards into the leaves, or even climbing up to reach them, was nothing compared to what you did when you got your prizes home.
The common horse chestnut, Aesculus hippocastanum, is a such a majestic tree.
The Campaign For Real Conkers says many conkers have fallen early from yellowing horse chestnut trees before they are ripe enough to be used for the popular pastime.