Hosta

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Hosta

 

(a day, or plantain, lily), a genus of perennial herbaceous plants of the family Liliaceae. The rhizome is compact or short-branched. The numerous radical leaves vary in shape from narrowly lanceolate to broadly ovate, often with a cordate base; their coloration is green or, sometimes, gray-blue owing to a waxy sheen. There are many forms with variegated leaves. The flower stalks are sparsely leafed; the inflorescence is racemose and often unilateral. The perianth is funnelform or funnelform-campanulate, six-lobed, and lilac or violet in coloration (less commonly, white). The fruit is a leathery capsule. There are about 40 species (some of cultivated origin), distributed in temperate and warm regions of Southeast Asia. The USSR has two species, growing in the southern Primor’e, on Sakhalin, and on the Kuril Islands. Plantain lilies are valuable shade-tolerant foliage ornamentals. They are often cultivated under the generic name Funkia.

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well, doing something over the hostas that he would find easier to do than I would.
If you want to maintain the volume of the main clump of your hosta rather than making several new, evenly-sized pieces, treat it like a cake and cut out one or two slices before returning the mother clump to the soil.
Ranging in size from the 4-inch Teeny Weeny Bikini to the prehistoric looking giants such as Empress Woo, which grows to 4 feet wide and equally as tall, hostas are far from ordinary.
As for thriving in shade, it is truer to say that hostas are shade-tolerant rather than revelling in it.
Although hostas are one of the most popular and dependable of shade plants, Keith Wiley warns in his book, Shade: Ideas and Inspiration for Shady Gardens, against using too many single hostas of different varieties in one bed.
Provided they are kept moist, hostas should do well in hanging baskets because they escape slugs and snails.
No Bait Clumping - Pellets should be evenly dispersed around snails' and slugs' favorite plants, such as hostas, ornamental kale/cabbage, winter pansies and primrose.
HOSTAS are one of my favourite plants to use in design, they originate from Northeast Asia, Japan, China and Korea and they prefer shade and good loamy soil.
A truly amazing development for hostas, 'White Feather' will produce large, pure white, lush leaves that emerge in late spring/ early summer.
The ground is moist and is the perfect place to grow damp-loving ferns and hostas, rodgersias and water irises.