hot flash


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hot flash

[′hät ‚flash]
(physiology)
A sudden transitory sensation of heat, often involving the whole body, due to cessation of ovarian function; a symptom of the climacteric.
References in periodicals archive ?
We should also note that this same research group has a history of investigating several hot flash treatments and proving them ineffective, including vitamin E in 1998, (10) soy in 2000, (11) black cohosh in 2006, (12) acupuncture in 2007, (13) flax seed lignins in 2012, (14) and paced breathing in 2013.
She noted that in a systematic review of gabapentin for hot flashes in 901 patients in seven clinical trials, including four studies in breast cancer survivors, the drug resulted in 20%-30% reductions in hot flash frequency and severity, but with a dropout rate twice that for placebo (Clin.
But some doctors told the committee that women are clamoring for hot flash treatments and are growing desperate.
Extracted or synthesized soybean isoflavones reduce menopausal hot flash frequency and severity: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.
Patients reported a 53% reduction in hot flash frequency compared with baseline (P<.
The SB reportedly can reduce hot flash (typically tails and domes) by up to 33% compared with other machines.
A recent trial showed that neither black cohosh nor red clover significantly reduced the frequency of hot flash symptoms compared with placebo.
A total of 55% of women receiving active drug showed a decline of at least 50% in hot flash frequency, compared with 36% of women receiving placebo.
In 21 women who completed the study, hot flash frequency was cut in half and the overall "hot flash score" diminished by an average of 57%.
Women recorded their hot flashes in a diary and indicated the severity of each hot flash on a visual analog scale (1 = mild, 4 = severe).
Antidepressants called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the blood pressure--lowering drug clonidine lowered that tally by one additional hot flash per day, Nelson says.
In your March/April 2004 issue on hot flashes, it did not contain one very important piece of advice for women: keep a diary of when the hot flash begins, and particularly, where it begins on the body as this is an important coping strategy for how one dresses, for example, in layers.