hubris

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hubris

, hybris
(in Greek tragedy) an excess of ambition, pride, etc., ultimately causing the transgressor's ruin
References in periodicals archive ?
As such, it is a way of asserting power and privilege, of hubristically holding oneself up as a moral exemplar.
This concerns not merely a "traffic was bad, and we had to skip dessert to rush here only to fight for parking" set of peripheral circumstances; much more to the point, it concerns a company which, before the stage action even began, had hubristically announced a credo to which they did not adhere in practice, sneered at academia, and proudly disdained four hundred years of theatrical practice and theory.
Examples abound of aggressive acquisitions, built on hubristically estimated synergies, that fail to create the value that was promised.
When the first mate, Starbuck, characterizes Ahab's intended vengeance against a dumb brute (for "demasting" him of his leg) as blasphemous, Ahab damns the whale for his "inscrutable malice" and rants hubristically to Starbuck: "Talk not to me of blasphemy, man; I'd strike the sun if it insulted me.
After a decade of debt during which the Government hubristically claimed it had abolished boom and bust our economy is in turmoil.
It's billed, hubristically, as "A Stampede of Wildly Passionate Music and Dance.
To allow myself to be constituted by such conventions about language (or any other social practice and behavior, even if ideal and situated in some past community of forms) is either foolishly weak or hubristically ambitious: one either accepts that one's life is lived as a form of rumor or one hopes to re-establish by one's own good grammar a community of forms of extravagant and fastidious self-consciousness.
Today, we have a similar plethora of individuals and organisations arguing about what is good for children, some informed and sensitive, others hubristically pursuing the bee in their bonnet.
Somewhat hubristically, Manne's article seems to substitute his own autobiographical experience for the national narrative.
The disclosure of the different characters of time provides the Bishop of Hippo with a theoretical ground (both philosophical and theological) for a politics that is neither hubristically optimistic, nor darkly pessimistic.