humanity


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

humanity

1. the study of literature, philosophy, and the arts
2. the study of Ancient Greek and Roman language, literature, etc.
References in classic literature ?
Though the surface of the sea of history seemed motionless, the movement of humanity went on as unceasingly as the flow of time.
It would take a dozen pages to enumerate all the reproaches the historians address to him, based on their knowledge of what is good for humanity.
But the universal necessity of living, of drinking, of eating-- in short, the whole scientific conviction that this necessity can only be satisfied by universal co-operation and the solidarity of interests--is, it seems to me, a strong enough idea to serve as a basis, so to speak, and a 'spring of life,' for humanity in future centuries," said Gavrila Ardalionovitch, now thoroughly roused.
The instinct of self-preservation is the normal law of humanity.
In fact, from the origin of things down to the fifteenth century of the Christian era, inclusive, architecture is the great book of humanity, the principal expression of man in his different stages of development, either as a force or as an intelligence.
Without them, anarchy would reign and humanity would drop backward into the primitive night out of which it had so painfully emerged.
It may, perhaps, be fairly questioned, whether any other portion of the population of the earth could have endured the privations, sufferings and horrors of slavery, without having become more degraded in the scale of humanity than the slaves of African descent.
That is quite possible,' remarked Heathcliff, forcing himself to seem calm: 'quite possible that your master should have nothing but common humanity and a sense of duty to fall back upon.
But Monsieur Filon's stories sometimes end as merrily as they begin; and always he is all delicacy--a delicacy which keeps his large yet minute antiquarian knowledge of that vanished time ever in service to a direct interest in humanity as it is permanently, alike before and after '93.
The whole power of mankind belongs to them, forever and beyond recall--do what it can, strive as it will, humanity lives for them and dies for them
We are most interested when science reports what those men already know practically or instinctively, for that alone is a true humanity, or account of human experience.
I was a poet and a grand gentleman, I fell in love; I came in for countless millions and immediately devoted them to humanity, and at the same time I confessed before all the people my shameful deeds, which, of course, were not merely shameful, but had in them much that was "sublime and beautiful" something in the Manfred style.

Full browser ?