humour

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Related to humors: humoral theory

humour

(US), humor
1. any of various fluids in the body, esp the aqueous humour and vitreous humour
2. Archaic any of the four bodily fluids (blood, phlegm, choler or yellow bile, melancholy or black bile) formerly thought to determine emotional and physical disposition

humour

amusement, laughter, and the like created by the paradoxical, ironic outcomes of social situations, language, and the portrayal of these in literature, art and the theatre. Although humour is a universal feature of human societies and a diverse literature exists (not least the work of Freud), the treatment of humour, has been only fragmentary within sociology, despite its importance in social life. See M. Mulkay, On Humour (1988).

humour

References in classic literature ?
He looked at Arnold, with the irrepressible humor twinkling merrily in his eyes, and twitching sharply at the corners of his lips.
Sir Patrick rose to his feet; his satirical humor was silenced at last.
Since earliest childhood he had been a searcher after fun, much to the sorrow of his fellow-apes, and now he saw the humor of the frightened panic of the apes and the baffled rage of Numa even in this grim jungle adventure which had robbed Mamka of life, and jeopardized that of many members of the tribe.
But Tarzan went abroad alone, for Tarzan was a man-thing and sought amusement and adventure and such humor as the grim and terrible jungle offers to those who know it and do not fear it--a weird humor shot with blazing eyes and dappled with the crimson of lifeblood.
He assumes a too simplified vision of modernity: Galileo, whom he quotes as the symbol of modern science, was profoundly influenced - in his own work as a scientist - by Pythagorean and neo-platonic mysticism; astrology was amply practiced by nineteenth-century European scientists, and references to humors and heavens can be found in contemporary political language.
Parel convincingly shows that Machiavelli's vision of the world was profoundly indebted to Renaissance theory of heavens and humor and fully accepted the idea that changes in bodily humors - both in individual body and in the body politics - are linked to changes in the motions of the heavens.
Indeed, Parel argues, the theory of heavens and humors is the foundation of Machiavelli's political theory.
Humors trump card in the game of life involves its uncanny ability to put people where they belong and thrive, next to one another, sharing.
They served all agents of humor (as they still do in modern times) to give respite and pause to a complex and stressful world.
he never finished his dissertation) in psychology, he teaches a course called The Art and Science of Humor at the University of Michigan.
I'm 'pro-Jewish' especially with anyone who's anti-" Moment editor Nadine Epstein talked with Mankoff about the psychology and history of Jewish and American humor.