humus


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humus

(hyo͞o`məs), organic matter that has decayed to a relatively stable, amorphous state. It is an important biological constituent of fertile soilsoil,
surface layer of the earth, composed of fine rock material disintegrated by geological processes; and humus, the organic remains of decomposed vegetation. In agriculture, soil is the medium that supports crop plants, both physically and biologically.
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. Humus is formed by the decomposing action of soil microorganisms (e.g., bacteria and fungi), which break down animal and vegetable material into elements that can be used by growing plants. Technically, humus, as the end result of this process, is less valuable for plant growth than are the products formed during active decomposition (see fertilizerfertilizer,
organic or inorganic material containing one or more of the nutrients—mainly nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, and other essential elements required for plant growth.
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). Because of its low specific weight and high surface area, humus has a profound effect upon the physical properties of mineral soils with regard to improved soil structure, water intake and reservoir capacity, ability to resist erosion, and the ability to hold chemical elements in a form readily accessible to plants.

Humus

 

an organic, normally dark-colored part of the soil formed as a result of biochemical transformation of plant and animal residues. Humus consists of humic acids (most important for soil fertility) and fulvic acids (crenic acids). Humus contains the main elements of plant nutrition that become available to plants as a result of microbial activity.

humus

[′hyü·məs]
(geology)
The amorphous, ordinarily dark-colored, colloidal matter in soil; a complex of the fractions of organic matter of plant, animal, and microbial origin that are most resistant to decomposition.

humus

A brown or black material formed by the partial decomposition of vegetable or animal matter; the organic portion of soil.

humus

a dark brown or black colloidal mass of partially decomposed organic matter in the soil. It improves the fertility and water retention of the soil and is therefore important for plant growth
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the formation of humus soil horizon (H) in time (t) may be represented as follows:
Regional peculiarities exist in the formation and fabric of humus cover caused by differences between soils and climatic conditions.
The objectives of this work were to evaluate: (1) the major fractions of soil B with special emphasis on humus and water-mobile phases; and (2) changes in the soil B forms and mobility due to utilisation of RWW.
In addition, loamy and humus soils encouraged nodulation more than the other soil types since all beans varieties and groundnut ALR2 nodulated well in these soils.
Although fulvic acids prevail in the humus of the shale studied (the ratio of fulvic acids to humic ones is 1.
The composter excels at making compost by one of three methods: Vermi-composting (harvest castings once or twice a year); modified casual (mix/aerate from once a week to twice a month for humus in four to eight weeks); and accelerated (14-day humus requires selected debris and mixing every three days).
When you introduce tillage and compaction, there's excess air, and humus breaks from long chains of carbon into carbon dioxide, which then goes into the air.
During busy rehearsal days you can bring small meals to the studio, such as a turkey sandwich, carrots dipped in humus, or almonds with an apple, and refuel as the need arises.
Peat humus grows at about a half a millimetre a year.
It has the worldwide patent to then use this humus as the filter to cleanse the wastewater.
Fortunately we had enough pita bread and humus to hold 'em at bay until we made our getaway.