Hunter


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hunter

1. a specially bred horse used in hunting, usually characterized by strength and stamina
2. a specially bred dog used to hunt game

Hunter

 

a saddle horse bred in England and Ireland for hunting and jumping over hurdles (steeplechase racing). The name “hunter” is applied to horses of pure saddle horse breed and crossbreeds of pure saddle horse stallions with coach horses or large saddle horses. Hunters are strong and capable of great endurance, with free, spacious movements. a powerful spring, and sufficient speed to pursue an animal in the hunt. The height at the withers is 155–175 cm. Hunters vary in color, and they are even-tempered. In England a pedigree book is kept in which are entered the stallions and mares used to produce hunters.

REFERENCE

Rukovodstvo po razvedeniiu zhivotnykh, vol. 3, book 1. Moscow. 1965. (Translated from German.)

G. G. KHITENKOV


Hunter

 

a river in southeastern Australia. The Hunter rises in the Liverpool Range and flows into the Tasman Sea of the Pacific Ocean. It measures 465 km in length and drains an area of 20,500 sq km. The mean flow rate is 52 cu m per sec. High water occurs between June and August. The river is subject to frequent destructive freshets and floods. Dams and reservoirs have been built to control the river’s flow and provide water for irrigation The city of Newcastle is situated at the river’s mouth. The Hunter is navigable as far as the city of Morpeth.

References in classic literature ?
Leo Hunter, starting up, in an affected rapture of surprise.
Leo Hunter, 'I must make you promise not to stir from my side the whole day.
But when the Hunter had finished his sleep and awoke, he found that his love had betrayed him and left him alone on the wild mountain.
But the Hunter had listened to their talk, and as soon as they had gone he rose and climbed to the summit.
It is not easy to do justice to the exulting feelings of the worthy captain at finding himself at the head of a stout band of hunters, trappers, and woodmen; fairly launched on the broad prairies, with his face to the boundless West.
The feuds of White Plume, however, had not been confined to the red men; he had much to say of brushes with bee hunters, a class of offenders for whom he seemed to cherish a particular abhorrence.
It was no easy task, waiting on the cabin table, where sat Wolf Larsen, Johansen, and the six hunters.
As I sat in my bunk examining it (the six hunters were all in the steerage, smoking and talking in loud voices), Henderson took a passing glance at it.
Hunter brought the boat round under the stern-port, and Joyce and I set to work loading her with powder tins, muskets, bags of biscuits, kegs of pork, a cask of cognac, and my invaluable medicine chest.
Then, leaving Joyce to guard them--one man, to be sure, but with half a dozen muskets-- Hunter and I returned to the jolly-boat and loaded ourselves once more.
He felt the necessity, also, of having a greater number of hunters, not merely to keep up a supply of provisions throughout their long and arduous expedition, but also as a protection and defense, in case of Indian hostilities.
The hunters, grizzled and gray, and lusty and young, were aghast.