hunt

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Related to hunts: scavenger hunts, Witch hunts

Hunt

1. Henry, known as Orator Hunt. 1773--1835, British radical, who led the mass meeting that ended in the Peterloo Massacre (1819)
2. (William) Holman. 1827--1910, British painter; a founder of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood (1848)
3. James. 1947--93, British motor-racing driver: world champion 1976
4. (Henry Cecil) John, Baron. 1910--98, British army officer and mountaineer. He planned and led the expedition that first climbed Mount Everest (1953)
5. (James Henry) Leigh . 1784--1859, British poet and essayist: a founder of The Examiner (1808) in which he promoted the work of Keats and Shelley

hunt

[hənt]
(aerospace engineering)
Of an aircraft or rocket, to weave about its flight path, as if seeking a new direction or another angle of attack; specifically, to yaw back and forth.
Of a control surface, to rotate up and down or back and forth without being detected by the pilot.

hunt

i. Of an aircraft: To weave about its flight path, as if seeking a new direction or another angle of attack. Specifically, to yaw back and forth.
ii. Of a control surface: To rotate up and down or back and forth without being deflected by the pilot.
iii. Of a control system: To oscillate about a selected value.
iv. Of an indicator on a display: To swing back and forth or to oscillate, especially rather slowly.

hunt

To switch to a different telephone line if the first one is busy. A "hunt group" is a series of telephone lines identified as a group such that if one line is busy, the next available line is used (it "hunts" to the next line). Local telephone companies provide hunting for a relatively small monthly fee. PBXs provide this feature automatically to their station sets for outbound line access.
References in classic literature ?
But now it might not be; the soldiers neared the ford, and Galazi knew well that his grey people would not hunt on the further plain, though for this he had heard one reason only, that which was given him by the lips of the dead in a dream.
The Law of the Jungle, which never orders anything without a reason, forbids every beast to eat Man except when he is killing to show his children how to kill, and then he must hunt outside the hunting grounds of his pack or tribe.
If an earth were overlooked, it meant some dispute as to the ownership of the land, and then and there the Hunt checked and settled it in this wise: The Governor and the Inspector side by side, but the latter half a horse's length to the rear; both bare-shouldered claimants well in front; the villagers half-mooned behind them, and Farag with the pack, who quite understood the performance, sitting down on the left.
Like lions, fear is a different thing in different men, but to me the only pleasure in the hunt is the knowledge that the hunted thing has power to harm me as much as I have to harm him.
It was quite evident that he was coming down into the desert to hunt.
I've seen a few unlikely things in these Solomons--rats two feet long, butterflies the Commissioner hunts with a shot-gun, ear-ornaments that would shame the devil, and head-hunting devils that make the devil look like an angel.
By the time I was eleven he was taking me on my first deer hunts.
He hunts with evil spirits," some of the people contended, "wherefore his hunting is rewarded.
The Queen was abroad to-day in order to hunt, but finding it disposed to rain she kept in her coach; she hunts in a chaise with one horse, which she drives herself, and drives furiously, like Jehu, and is a mighty hunter, like Nimrod.
Is the repetition of the hunts and of Gawain's experience in the castle skilful or the reverse, in plan and in execution?
There is a patience of the wild--dogged, tireless, persistent as life itself--that holds motionless for endless hours the spider in its web, the snake in its coils, the panther in its ambuscade; this patience belongs peculiarly to life when it hunts its living food; and it belonged to Buck as he clung to the flank of the herd, retarding its march, irritating the young bulls, worrying the cows with their half-grown calves, and driving the wounded bull mad with helpless rage.
They had race horses, and Russian pancakes and bear hunts and three-horse sledges, and gypsies and drinking feasts, with the Russian accompaniment of broken crockery.