Hydatiform Mole

(redirected from hydatidiform mole)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

hydatiform mole

[hī′dad·ə‚fȯrm ′mōl]
(medicine)
A benign placental tumor formed as a cystic growth of the chorionic villi. Also known as hydatiform tumor.

Hydatiform Mole

 

an abnormal pregnancy resulting from a pathologic ovum with proliferation of the epithelium of the chorion frondosum and edema of the stroma of the villi. The causes of a hydatiform mole are not known. Externally it resembles a grape cluster, since it is a cluster of variously sized cysts with transparent contents.

When there is a hydatiform mole and changes in the villi are widespread, the fetus most often dies; however, even after the death of the fetus the mole continues to develop. As a result of proliferation of the vesicles, the uterus enlarges comparatively rapidly, and its size does not correspond to the term of the pregnancy. One of the principal symptoms of a hydatiform mole is the appearance in the third or fourth month of pregnancy of bloody discharges and hemorrhages from the genital tract, which result from the partial sloughing off of cysts from the uterine walls. The blood is watery and dark in color and contains the rejected cysts of the mole. Hemorrhage leads to considerable anemia and may endanger the woman’s life if intensified.

Often when there is a hydatiform mole, symptoms of late toxemia of pregnancy appear as early as the first half of the pregnancy. In the rare invasive form of hydatiform mole the cysts deeply penetrate the musculature of the uterus, which may lead to perforation of the uterus and severe intra-abdominal hemorrhage. The greatest danger of an hydatiform mole is the possible development of a malignant tumor, that is, a chorionepithelioma.

Treatment includes the use of preparations that contract the uterus. The cysts of the mole can also be sucked out with a special vacuum apparatus. After removal of a hydatiform mole the woman remains under a doctor’s care for 1½ to two years.

A. P. KIRIUSHCHENKOV

References in periodicals archive ?
Reporting and incidence trends of hydatidiform mole in Sweden 1973-2004.
Parental origin and phenotype of triploidy in spontaneous abortions: predominance ofdiandry and association with the partial hydatidiform mole.
The hydatidiform mole is a uterine tumor that occasionally develops in which the fetus is absent and the placental tissue is abnormally large, arising most often from a sperm's fertilizing an ovum in which the female pronucleus is absent.
The syndromes of hydatidiform mole, II: morphologic evolution of the complete and partial mole.
Overdiagnosis of complete and partial hydatidiform mole in tubal ectopic pregnancies.
Bedate and Cefalo also note that some embryos with normal genetic constitutions fail to develop into fetuses precisely because they lack complementary external information, and become nonpersonal biological entities such as tumors or hydatidiform moles.
Complete hydatidiform moles may also exhibit high levels of IGF-II expression and loss of expression of [p57.
On the basis of our findings, we suggest that, when hydatidiform mole is suspected, the urine sample should be diluted at least 1:10, particularly when the ACON urine hCG One Step Pregnancy Device (Format: FHC-102) is used, to avoid inaccurate urine hCG results.
1) The gross appearance of these tumors is not specific; however, the retiform type may show polypoid and papillary structures simulating serous papillary cystic tumors or a hydatidiform mole.
Complete hydatidiform mole lacks a fetal component, and DNA originating from a hydatidiform mole (molar DNA) that is detected in the maternal circulation is thought to originate from vinous tissue.
Circulating inhibin forms in patients with hydatidiform mole.