hydraulic analogy


Also found in: Wikipedia.

hydraulic analogy

[hī′drȯ·lik ə′nal·ə·jē]
(fluid mechanics)
The analogy between the flow of a shallow liquid and the flow of a compressible gas; various phenomena such as shock waves occur in both systems; the analogy requires neglect of vertical accelerations in the liquid, and restrictions on the ratio of specific heats for the gas.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The two-dimensional axi-symmetric equivalent combustor model[6-8] for the present investigations was designed, using the hydraulic analogy as suggested by Rao and Seshadri [2-5].
Theory of Hydraulic analogy for steady and unsteady gas dynamics, modern developments in gas dynamics".
3] J S Rao, VV R Rao and V seshadri, " Hydraulic analogy for Non-ideal compressible gas flows" proceeding of TFTOMM, international conferences, rotor dynamic problems in power plants, Rome,1982,p267.
4] J S Rao and V seshadri " Investigation of flow in the combustion chamber of the GTX engine using Hydraulic analogy.
Table 1: Analogous quantities of classical hydraulic analogy 2D gas flow Free Surface incompressible water flow Temperature ratio T/T0 Hydraulic depth ratio h/h0 Density ratio Hydraulic depth ratio h/h0 Pressure ratio P/P0 Sq of hydraulic depths ratio (h/h0)2 Sound Velocity a0 Wave Velocity _(gh) Mach number V/ a0 Froude number V/_(gh) Velocity ratio V/Vmax Velocity ratio V/ Vmax Subsonic flow M<1 Streaming Water flow Fr<1 Supersonic flow M>1 Shooting Water Flow Fr>1 Compressible shock Hydraulic jump
The principal approaches for estimating the evacuation time are: (1) an empirical correlation of total evacuation time for building, (2) a hydraulic analogy to simulate people as fluid particles, and (3) a hydraulic analogy to simulate people as fluid particles with consideration of the behavioral aspects of the people.
This paper focuses on estimating evacuation time using a hydraulic analogy to simulate people as fluid particles without consideration of the behavioral aspects of the people.
Evacuation by hydraulic analogy is based on the following assumptions:
Nelson and MacLennan refer to this small distance as a "boundary layer", in keeping with the hydraulic analogy for people movement.