hymnology

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hymnology

1. the study of hymn composition
2. another word for hymnody
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The last two hymnological essays in the book are by scholars not typically associated with the field.
As for hymnological studies generally, the detail is too dense and multifaceted to be assimilated easily.
This hymnological accumulation of Calvinist and Arminian divinity continued unabated through the Civil War and beyond.
Bruce, And They All Sang Hallelujah: Plain-Folk Camp-Meeting Religion in the South, 1800-1845 (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1974); Sandra Sizer [Frankiel], Gospel Hymns and Social Religion: The Rhetoric of Nineteenth Century Religion (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1978); Jon Michael Spencer, Protest and Praise: Sacred Music of Black Religion (Minneapolis: Augsburg Fortress, 1990) and Black Hymnody: A Hymnological History of the African-American Church (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1992); June Hadden Hobbs, "I Sing for I Cannot be Silent": The Feminization of American Hymnody, 1870-1920 (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1997).
Norton's section on texts and tunes alone serves as a basic hymnological study of the eighteenth century in America as it gives a glimpse of the world surrounding Mercer's adult ministry.
While retaining standard hymnological inquiries into biographical, bibliographical, and literary matters, Norton sets those interests in a much wider context that also includes race, class, gender, religious and regional history, and musical resources.
In hymnological sources, the earlier of the two books has generally been called merely a reprint of Benjamin Wallin's Evangelical Hymns and Songs; however, the presence of hymns by Watts and Stennett shows that this collection was much more than that.
In the late 1990s, hymnological research received a great boost through the publication of Nicholas Temperley's Hymn Tune Index: A Census of English-Language Hymn Tunes in Printed Sources from 1535 to 1820, and the Hymntune Index and Related Hymn Materials, compiled by D.
Julian" has long been the indispensable starting point for many textual hymnological studies; "Temperley" will quickly become the first and continuing source for any serious study of English hymn tunes.
A team of hymnologists was enlisted to investigate hymnological collections around the world.
Their context, then, is more than liturgical, more than hymnological, more than literary, more than musical; and a correspondingly broad conceptualization of the subject contributed to the general esteem that has long been accorded Percy Dearmer, Ralph Vaughan Williams, and Martin Shaw's The Oxford Book of Carols, first published by Oxford University Press in 1928.