hyoid


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Related to hyoid: Lacrimals

hyoid

[′hī‚ȯid]
(anatomy)
A bone or complex of bones at the base of the tongue supporting the tongue and its muscles.
Of or pertaining to structures derived from the hyoid arch.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thyroglossal duct cysts are the most common congenital neck masses and can form anywhere along the course of the thyroglossal duct, which runs from the thyroid bed to the foramen cecum, passing directly adjacent to the hyoid bone.
For this case, advanced imaging likely would have been beneficial before surgery, especially because the cyst appeared to incorporate the jugular vein and hyoid apparatus cranially.
Submental sEMG and hyoid movement during Mendelsohn maneuver, effortful swallow, and expiratory muscle strength training.
Whether piscivorous or herbivorous, fishes employ the same suction-feeding mechanism for capture of prey by synchronizing opening of the mouth, depression of the hyoid, and opercular expansion to create a flow of water into the mouth (Day et al.
This theory has been suspected ever since the 1989 discovery of a Neanderthal hyoid in the Kebara Cave in Israel, however, the theory gained credence after a team of researchers analysed a fossil Neanderthal throat bone using 3D X-ray imaging and mechanical modelling, the BBC reported.
My fingers settled on Ali's hyoid while I cupped her posterior cervical muscles.
Some resemblances were noted to species of 'Loxops' (which included a minimum of three currently recognized genera) and to cardueline finches in general (Bock 1970, Richards and Bock 1973) but without an assessment of how the hyoid musculature of Ciridops might differ from that of its presumed closer relatives such as Vestiaria or Himatione.
of The hyoid bone in your throat is the only bone in your body unttached to any other.
A new analysis of a Homo heidelbergensis individual's skull and upper spine bones, as well as a horseshoe-shaped neck bone called the hyoid, suggests that this long-extinct species could have produced speech sounds, paleontologist Ignacio Martinez of the University of Alcala, Spain, reported on April 12.
On examination there was tenderness on palpation of the left hyoid bone.
SPRINGY BONE/ELASTIC LAYER: The woodpecker has a springy hyoid bone that supports its tongue and evenly distributes loads (forces on a structure).
Normally, this diverticulum divides into two lobes and passes ventral to the laryngeal cartilage and hyoid bone.