hyoid

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hyoid

[′hī‚ȯid]
(anatomy)
A bone or complex of bones at the base of the tongue supporting the tongue and its muscles.
Of or pertaining to structures derived from the hyoid arch.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cysts are classically midline, associated with the hyoid bone, move with swallowing or tongue protrusion, and often initially present with some degree of inflammation, sometimes after an upper respiratory tract infection.
Whilst this case concerns an isolated dislocation within the hyoid bone, hyoid bone fractures are a much more commonly reported injury.
The lateral pharyngeal space is an inverted cone extending from the sphenoid bone to the hyoid bone.
These cysts are frequently connected to the hyoid bone and are therefore generally associated with upward movement on swallowing.
Although superficially lip-smacking appears to involve simply rapid opening and closing of the lips, the x-ray movies show that lip-smacking is actually a complex behavior, requiring rapid, coordinated movements of the lips, jaw, tongue and the hyoid bone (which provides the supporting skeleton for the larynx and tongue).
Although superficially lip-smacking appears to involve simply rapid opening and closing of the lips, the x-ray movies show that lip-smacking is actually a complex behaviour, requiring rapid, coordinated movements of the lips, jaw, tongue and the hyoid bone (which provides the supporting skeleton for the larynx and tongue).
showing soft tissue oedema around the orotracheal tube, oropharynx and laryngopharynx extending from the posterior aspect of the hyoid bone down to the level of the thyroid cartilage.
The hyoid bone is the only bone in the human body that is not articulated to any other bone.
The procedure not only results in a more anterior post-operative position of the tongue, but it also improves the post-operative position of the hyoid bone.
Variables for which significant differences were found (vs normal swallows) included peak pharyngeal pressure, UES contraction pressure, UES opening duration, duration of hyoid-UES separation, duration of laryngeal elevation, bolus transit time, hyoid excursion, distance between the hyoid bone and the thyroid cartilage, duration of contraction for various muscles, and maximum and mean electromyography amplitude for various muscles (see Appendix).
The thyroglossal duct is intimately associated with the hyoid bone (Figure 1) and often passes directly through it.
In addition to knowing the pathway of both recurrent laryngeal nerves, the physician must be aware that, superior to the hyoid bone, the vagus nerves have small branches to the pharynx, which assist with swallowing and the gag reflex.