hyperacusia

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Related to hyperacusis: misophonia

hyperacusia

[‚hī·pər·ə′kyü·zhə]
(medicine)
A hearing impairment characterized by an acute sense of hearing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hyperacusis has been defined as "unusual tolerance to ordinary environmental sounds" or "consistently exaggerated or inappropriate responses to sounds" that are neither uncomfortably loud nor threatening to a typical person.
The age distribution of signs and symptoms in otology (Hearing loss, Tinnitus, Hyperacusis, headache) pertaining to noise induced hearing loss in 63 fishermen are mentioned in Table 4.
Jastreboff said a proper diagnosis is important, as similar conditions such as hyperacusis (which is characterized by a decreased tolerance to certain frequencies) are treated differently.
Scientifically, a better understanding of the brain's reaction to noise could help our understanding of medical conditions where people have a decreased sound tolerance such as hyperacusis, misophonia (literally a "hatred of sound") and autism when there is sensitivity to noise.
Less common symptoms include hyperacusis, decreased production of tears, altered taste, and numbness or pain around the ear of the affected site.
Thus, traction on the cranial nerves results in hyperacusis and dizziness (CN VIII), horizontal diplopia (CN VI) and facial numbness (CN V) or facial weakness (CN VII).
I am severely hearing-impaired, with tinnitus (ringing in the ears) and hyperacusis (sensitivity to loud sound).
High number of cases shows cardiac and endocrine problems, sleep disturbances, selective hyperacusis and spatial cognition disorders.
She also denied hyperacusis, blurred vision, diplopia, dysarthria, dysphagia, vertigo or other bulbar symptoms.
Following the introduction, chapters address the anatomy and physiology of the peripheral auditory system; medical aspects of otologic damage from noise in musicians; tinnitus, hyperacusis, and music; and the risk of music induced hearing loss from headphones.
Studies in the past have reported that increasing numbers of adolescents and young adults now experience symptoms indicative of poor hearing, such as distortion, tinnitus, hyperacusis or threshold shifts, BBC radio reported.
The compulsion that has returned me to Poe's stories over and over again since that discovery is a recognition of the fear generated by claustrophobic and unrevealed spaces, by confinement and absolute silence, and by hyperacusis, a collapsed tolerance to normal environmental sounds, or what I would call paranoid listening.